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  • Gound and Formed Jerky How to Make Ground and Formed Jerky at Home.

    Learn how to make Ground and Formed Jerky with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    What Is Ground and Formed Jerky?

    The simplest definition of Jerky is just meat that has been cured and dried. There are many different ways to make and process jerky the most common being sliced whole muscle or restructured jerky. I am going to be making a restructured jerky using the Weston #8 black series grinder, a meat mixer, a Walton’s Stuffer with the All-Around Jerky Maker and a smoker to cook and dehydrate it.

    Meat Block

    15 lb of lean beef

    Additives

    9.1 oz of Dill Pickle Jerky or Snack Stick Seasoning
    0.6 oz or 3 tsp of Sure Cure (included with purchase of seasoning)
    1.2 oz Smoked Meat Stabilizer

    Process

    First thing you might want to do is to trim off the fat cap, since we are grinding this and then extruding it this is not 100% necessary and is just a personal preference. I am going to grind this meat twice, first through a 3/8 plate and then through a 1/8 inch plate. You could also use already ground beef purchased from a store if you don’t have a grinder. I’ve cut the meat into small pieces for this smaller #8 grinder. Make sure your plates and knives are sharp and well oiled to reduce stress on both the machine and the meat.

    Meat Mixing

    Now I am going to mix in the seasoning, cure and Smoked Meat Stabilizer. Smoked Meat Stabilizer should not be used with water, so we did not add any. It will start to gas out almost immediately and this can be very dangerous to breath. With ground and formed jerky some people like to get protein extraction and some do not, I recommend you mix until you have protein extraction for a better texture. So I am using the Weston Meat Mixer.

    Extruding

    So now I am going to extrude this using a Waltons 7 lb sausage stuffer with the All Around Jerky Maker attached to it. This comes with a few different types of attachments, for this I am going to use the 2 slot die. As I extrude it the paper which sits underneath the Jerky Maker is going to move down the ramp with it. Now I am just going to keep extruding until I have everything in strips.

    Note

    Smoked Meat Stabilizer should not be used with water, so we did not add any. It will start to gas out almost immediately and this can be very dangerous to breath.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking for Home Smoking

    Stage 1 - 130° F 1 Hour with Dampers Wide Open
    Stage 2 - 145° F 2 Hours W/ Dampers 2/3rds Closed
    Stage 3 - 175° F Until Internal Temp Reaches 160°

    Thermal Processing & Smoking for Advanced Smokehouses

    Stage 1 - 110° F 10 minutes Relative Humidity (RH) 68
    Stage 2 - 130° F 20 Minutes RH 20
    Stage 3 - 135° F 90 Minutes RH 30
    Stage 4 - 155° F 60 Minutes RH 30
    Stage 5 - 155° F 90 Minutes RH 0
    Stage 6 - 180° F Until internal temp is 160° RH 0

    Cooling

    There is no need to put jerky in an ice bath as it is so dry and thin that it will stop the cooking process quickly enough by itself. It is important to let the jerky sit out at room temperature for about an hour before vac packing to prevent condensation from forming inside the package.

    Wrap up

    We started out with 15 lb of meat and ended with 8 lb of jerky so that is just about 50% loss so we are right where we would expect to be with the ability to control humidity in our smoker. The All Around Jerky Maker really made this entire process much easier than trying to do this with a Jerky Gun though that will certainly work as well, it will just take longer. The flavor of the Dill Pickle Seasoning is awesome, if you like Dill Pickles, that seems obvious but this does have a strong dill flavor!

    Additional Tips Do not add water if you are using Smoked Meat Stabilizer If you do not use Smoked Meat Stabilizer you will want to hold your product overnight to allow the cure to work in the meat Other Notes

    Just to make sure that I put this in here as many times as possible, if you are using the Smoked Meat Stabilizer (which I did) do not add water to your product or it will gas out and create a gas cloud. You don’t need to be scared of this product just be careful with it.

    Watch WaltonsTV: Ground and Formed Jerky Shop waltonsinc.com for Walton’s Sausage Stuffers Shop waltonsinc.com for All Around Jerky Maker Shop waltonsinc.com for Jerky Seasonings Shop waltonsinc.com for Smokers and Smokehouses

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  • Sliced Salami Salami Seasoning How to Make Salami

    Learn how to make Homemade Salami with Walton's and Meatgistics. Read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    What Is Salami?

    Salami is a type of cured sausage that can be made from pork, beef a combination of the two and can also be made from wild game. It can fermented and dry cured or cooked and smoked. We are going to use 100% beef so we are going to use our regular Salami Unit, if we were making this out of deer or wild game then the Cotto Salami might be a better choice. We are also going to be using Encapsulated Citric acid to give the meat that nice tang and carrot fiber to help with the bind. If you are making this out of Wild Game I would suggest you also use cold phosphate to increase the water holding capacity of the meat.

    Meat Block

    25 lb of Eye of the Round

    Additives

    1 Package (1.4375 lb) of Salami Seasoning
    1 oz of Sure Cure (Included with salami seasoning purchase)
    Fibrous Salami Casings
    2 Quarts of Ice Cold Water

    Optional Additives:
    Carrot Fiber
    Encapsulated Citric Acid
    Cold Phosphate

    Process

    Since this is salami we want to see particle definition in our finished product. That means we want to get our meat cold and keep it cold through the mixing process, once the meat heats up the fat will start to smear and we will lose our chance at a nice looking finished product. This step would be even more important if we were doing a fermented product to allow everything to dry properly but I still want a nice looking product so I put my meat and my head assembly to my grinder in the freezer to get everything cold. I am also going to separate my fat from my lean and grind them separately, I’m just going to cut off the fat cap and then put that back in the freezer until it is time to grind it.

    Before I start grinding I am going to soak my Fibrous Salami Casings in warm water to make them nice and pliable to make stuffing easier, they need to soak for about 30 minutes in warm water.

    I will grind my lean twice, once through a 3/8" plate and then through a 1/8 plate with our Weston #12 Butcher Series Grinder. Always remember to oil your plates and knives to keep friction and heat down. The fat I am just going to grind once through a 3/8 plate. I ground my fat last so I can go right from the grinding to the mixing without the fat warming up. If I wasn’t able to do this quickly I would put my fat back in the freezer.

    Meat Mixing

    Now we need to mix the seasoning, cure, carrot fiber and water with our lean meat and mix until we have protein extraction. As soon as the meat starts to get sticky I am going to add my fat and then mix that in for a minute. Then I’ll mix in my Encapsulated Citric Acid and mix it for another 60 seconds.

    Sausage Stuffing

    Next just stuff them into fibrous salami casings until they are full and smooth. Make sure you leave enough room at the end of each casing to clip them with a Hog Ring. The easiest way to do this at home is to use the Weston Auto Load Hog Ring Pliers

    Note

    With Salami we will want a longer link than we would with Bratwurst, something around 12-18" each. Either hang your casings on smoke sticks or lay on racks in your smokehouse or oven. Just be sure to leave a slight gap between the each salami.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking

    Stage 1 - 125° F for 1 hour
    Stage 2 - 140° F for 1 hour
    Stage 3 - 155° F for 2 hours
    Stage 4 - 175° F until internal meat temp of 160° F

    Cooling

    To help set the casing to the meat and also prevent wrinkling we need to shower the Salami or put them in an ice water bath. It should only take around 10 to 15 minutes to get the temperature to drop down. Then, we’ll let them set out for about 1 hour at room temperature before moving to the refrigerator/freezer. After we are totally done with the cooling process, then we will package in vacuum pouches for longer term storage.

    Wrap up

    Making this type of salami is a simple process, anyone who has made summer sausage before can easily do this, it is very similar and if you don’t care about particle definition it is even simpler.

    Additional Tips If I was doing this again I would have ground my fat through a 3/16 inch plate instead of 3/8 inch plate to make the fat particles a little smaller. Not because I disliked the size of the fat particles but because some of the fat rendered out of the meat during the cooking process. The particle definition only affects the appearance though so if you do not care about that, feel free to mix and grind all meat together. You can use collagen casings if you want but it will be a non-edible version which means you will have to soak it for 15 minutes in water that is 15°C and it has to be a 15% salt solution. Watch WaltonsTV: How to Make Salami Shop waltonsinc.com for Salami Seasoning Shop waltonsinc.com for Sausage Stuffers Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Mixers Shop waltonsinc.com for Home Grinders

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  • @dtabor This is normal, there are two types of pepperoni dry cured and cooked. The dry fermented pepperoni will be a hard pepperoni where as the cooked will have a consistency closer to summer sausage. We just recently made a batch of Fermented and Dry Cured here and will eventually be releasing a video on the process and the products needed to do it.

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  • D

    I tried some pepperoni a friend made using your spices and directions, it tasted great but didnt have the “hard” consistency of pepperoni that you purchase in a store. Was something done wrong or is this normal?

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  • Roast Beef How To Make Homemade Roast Beef

    Learn how to make Roast Beef with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    What Is Roast Beef?

    Roast beef can be made from Eye of the Round, Sirloin or Tri-Tip. It is very popular as both a main meal and is also often made specifically for cold cuts. Eye of the round is not as tender a cut as either Sirloin or a Tri-Tip so unless we process and cook this carefully we could end up with tough roast beef.

    Meat Block

    Eye of the Round with fat cap attached.

    Additives

    Butter Flavored Seasoning
    Prime Rib Rub
    Or
    Prime Rib Rub no MSG

    Process

    We are going to inject this with Butter Flavored soluble seasoning with the Walton’s Syringe Injector. This seasoning can be used on almost any cut of meat, it imparts a great flavor and it already has phosphates in it which will help increase the water holding capacity of the meat which will give us a juicier finished product.

    My injection is 1 lb of water and 5 oz of seasoning. The directions say to use this as a 10% pump but since it does not contain any cure I am going to just pump this until it won’t hold anymore. I am going to rub the outside with Prime Rib Rub seasoning, I want to really coat the outside with this since I am going to be slicing it thin and I won’t be getting much of the outside on each slice.

    Marinating

    Next I am going to vacuum pack it and let it marinate overnight. Since it is so large I am using one of our Vacmaster suction sealers and a vac bag roll. I create the size bag I need by slicing the roll and then sealing one side of the bag, then I place my meat inside and seal the bag. Let this sit overnight and be ready to smoke it in the morning.

    Note

    If you cannot inject or vacuum pack you might want to let it sit in the marinade longer than 12 hours. If you can let it sit a full 24 hours it will pick up and retain more of the seasoning.

    If you do not have a way to control humidity in your smoker then add a water pan and cook at 240° until internal temp is 140° for 12 minutes.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking

    Stage 1 - 120° - 30 Minutes RH 0
    Stage 2 - 140° - 60 Minutes RH 60
    Stage 3 - 160° - 30 Minutes RH 60
    Stage 4 - 180° Until internal temp is 140° for 12 minutes

    Cooling

    Serve right away for traditional meal.

    For cold cuts let it sit out at room temperature for an hour before moving to a cooler. For best results let it sit in cooler overnight before slicing for cold cuts.

    Wrap up

    All in all this was very easy to do and we were able to achieve very similar results with cooking it in our small smoker as we did with our professional smokehouse. The ability to accurately control humidity in the large smokehouse did allow us to cook quicker but the result was similar.

    Additional Tips If I was making this just for myself I would have stopped at 130° because I like it extra bloody. Watch WaltonsTV: How To Make Homemade Roast Beef Shop waltonsinc.com for Dry Marinades Shop waltonsinc.com for Dry Rubs Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealers Shop waltonsinc.com for Walton’s Syringe Injector

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  • Tender Jerky Slicer Knife How to Make Tender Jerky At Home

    Learn How to Make Tender Jerky At Home with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    What Is Jerky?

    When you make jerky at home you are seasoning, curing and removing moisture from the meat by drying it out. Doing this helps prevent the growth of bacteria in your meat as it has a low water activity level, meaning that there is not enough water to allow bacteria to grow. Homemade jerky has a tendency to be a little dry and brittle, however it is possible to make a jerky that has low water activity but is still shelf stable like the store bought jerky from some of the better jerky making companies. To make this at home the best way to do it is to use a seasoning and cure package like normal and then add additional sugar. The sugar envelopes the water molecules and prevents it from being able to cook or dry out of the meat but also makes it unavailable for microbial or bacterial growth.

    Meat Block

    25 lb of Eye of the Round

    Additives

    Walton’s Bold Jerky Seasoning Seasoning
    1 oz package of sure cure
    18% Additional Brown Sugar
    20% Water

    Process

    To do this we are going to be using 25 lb of eye of the round cuts with the fat cut off, a package of Walton’s Bold Jerky Seasoning and cure, then we will add 18% of the starting weight in light brown sugar and 20% of its starting weight in water. So this would mean we will be using 2.8 oz of brown sugar and 3.2 oz of water per lb of jerky. Because we need the water to dissolve as much sugar as possible we will be mixing that in first and then adding the cure and seasonings to the mix. You really need to mix this very well, my recommendation would be once you think you are done keep going for another few minutes.

    Slicing

    Since the goal here is to keep the pieces tender we will want to avoid cutting the pieces too thin so we will stay in the 1/4 to 3/8 range. Since we have large eye of the round cuts we are going to use a slicer, this will make the process faster and give us far more uniform cuts. If we want, we can cut the slices into strips to give it more of a classic jerky look before we tumble it. If you don’t have a slicer the Precise Slice Adjustable Knife from Victorinox works well, it will just be a little bit slower. Now, I put my eye of the rounds in the our blast freezer for about 45 minutes first to make the slicing easier and more accurate.

    Tumbling

    Once we have sliced this into pieces that are 1/4 - 3/8" thick we will tumble them for 40 minutes to allow the meat to pick up as much of the solution as possible. We will have all the data on how much of the solution was picked up in the meat, what the meat weighed before smoking and what it weighed after. Average loss in product when making jerky is between 50 and 75%, we are hoping to achieve much better results with this recipe.

    We are going to tumble this using our KMV Vacuum Tumbler but you can use something like the Marinade Express Vacuum Tumbler-Pro. We have used that before and it works well, you just need to make sure you do not exceed the recommendations for the drum or it will not pick up as much of the solution as you want it too.

    Now, if you don’t have a way to tumble this at home you will need to hold it in a container in a cooler for 12-24 hours to try to get the meat to pick up as much of the solution as possible. Without a tumbler mixing in all the sugar and seasoning becomes even more important so make 100% sure everything is dissolved.

    Note

    We started out with 24.5 lb of meat, 11.35 lb of solution, after tumbling there was .35 of a lb left that the meat did not pick up. Our finished dry weight was 19.8 lb giving us less than 20% product loss.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking

    Stage 1 - 20 Minutes at 110° (dampers wide open)
    Stage 2 - 30 Minutes at 135° (begin adding smoke)
    Stage 3 - 10 Minutes at 140° (dampers wide open again for drying)
    Stage 4 - 30 Minutes at 150°
    Stage 5 - 175° until internal temperature is 160°

    Advanced Thermal Processing & Smoking

    Stage 1 - 20 Minutes Dry at 110° 0 Relative Humidity(RH)
    Stage 2 - 30 Minutes Dry at 135° 0 (RH)
    Stage 3 - 10 Minutes Dry at 140° 0 (RH)
    Stage 4 - 30 Minutes Dry at 150° Wet at 126° 50 RH
    Stage 5 - 30 Minutes Dry at 155° Wet at 130° 50 RH
    Stage 6 - Dry at 175° Wet at 155 RH 60 until internal temperature is 160°

    Cooling

    Allow the jerky to sit out at room temperature for an hour before packaging to avoid condensation inside the packaging.

    Wrap up

    We were very pleased with these results of this recipe, it gave us a nice tender jerky with a good (if somewhat sweet) taste and our product loss was minimal. We started with 25 lb of meat and after smoking and dehydrating we ended up with just about 20 lb of jerky giving us a product loss of only 20% which is outstanding when a loss of 50% is generally considered good.

    Additional Tips It might be worth it to use a little more seasoning to cut through the sugar taste Other Notes

    Our water activity was below .85 so this is a shelf stable product but remember without a way to test water activity at home there is no way for you to be sure that yours will be and the main benefit to following this recipe would be that you end up with a soft and tender piece of jerky and far less product loss compared to traditional methods.

    Watch WaltonsTV: How to Make Tender Jerky At Home Shop waltonsinc.com for Weston 10" Slicer Shop waltonsinc.com for KMV Vacuum Tumbler Shop waltonsinc.com for Marinade Express Vacuum Tumbler - Pro

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