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Recent Posts

  • Meat Hacks: Pairing Cheese With Sausage

    Learn about Pairing Cheese With Sausage with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    Meat Hacks

    Pairing Cheese With Sausage
    Finding the right cheese to add to your sausage is like finding the right wine to serve with dinner, it can be daunting but when done correctly it can vastly improve the experience. I have some of my favorite Hi-Temp cheese pairings that I wanted to share with you guys. Now, everyone is different so feel free to experiment and if you come up with some you like let us know!

    Our Cheddar is the most popular cheese we sell as Cheddar is a flavor most people know and it goes well with many different flavors. I would describe this as a mild cheddar with very little sharpness to it. A good classic seasoning to use with Hi-Temp Cheddar Cheese would be Willies Snack Stick Seasoning, something a little outside the box but a great taste would be to use the Cheddar with Apple Bratwurst Seasoning. The sweetness of the Apple goes really well with the cheddar.

    Our Hot Pepper Cheese is comparable to a Pepper Jack in that it has a little hint of heat and a buttery flavor. Anyone, including children, should be able to handle this level of heat. I like using the Hot Pepper with something like Jerry’s Brat as it gives the classic taste of the seasoning just a little kick to liven it up. Try adding it to the Dill Pickle Snack Stick Seasoning to give a small but unexpected bit of spice to that seasoning. This is also a great cheese to add to any burgers are making.

    The Mozzarella is one of my favorites. It has an easily recognizable taste of pizza cheese and there is nowhere that that will be as appreciated as in a supreme pizza flavored brat. Seriously, if you like Pizza and you like brats and you haven’t tried this combination yet you need to get that on your next order! It’s also good to add when you want to cut the heat of a seasoning a little, it’s great when added to something like our Habanero BBQ Summer Sausage Seasoning.

    The Hi-Temp Swiss Cheese has a classic Swiss taste that goes well with many different flavors. The Philly Cheesesteak Brat really does well with some Swiss Cheese, that seasoning mixed with this cheese is a surefire hit. Swiss is often paired with pickled vegetables and meats and for the same reasons, it pairs extremely well with the Rueben Brat.

    The Sriracha Cheese has a really nice creaminess to it and no noticeable heat, even less heat than what is in the hot pepper cheese but what it lacks in hear it makes up for in flavor. Like the cheddar, it can go in almost anything but it is really good in Bloody Mary Snack Sticks. Or you can double up on the Sriracha Flavor and add it to the Sriracha Summer Sausage or Snack Stick Seasoning.

    Lastly, we have Hi-Temp Ghost Pepper Cheese. This is not a Cheese to be taken lightly or thrown into your mix without measuring first. I like heat and even for me, this stuff is pretty hot. Try adding it to a brat that you would not consider as spicy like a Blue Ribbon Bratwurst. Or for something really diabolical add 1 lb of this to 10 lb of Inferno Hot Bratwurst. Austin and I did this not too long ago and by the time we were done with the video I was dripping with sweat!

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    Shop waltonsinc.com for Hi-Temp Cheese Shop waltonsinc.com for Bratwurst Seasoning Subscribe to WaltonsTV on YouTube Baron 420 SS Broil King Baron 420 SS Walton's 7 lb Stuffer Walton's 7 lb Stuffer

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  • Meat Hacks: Why Use Hi-Temp Cheese?

    Learn why you should Use Hi-Temp Cheese with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    Meat Hacks

    Using Hi-Temp Cheese
    Hi Temp cheese is specially processed to give it a very high melting point. This allows it to retain its shape through the cooking process when its stuffed into your Snack Stick, Bratwurst or Summer Sausage. If you tried to use normal cheese and mixed that in the cheese would melt and then leak out and either make a mess on your drip pan or be trapped between the casing and the meat where it would congeal. You would end up with a little of the taste but have large holes in your sausage where the cheese was before it melted.

    As you can see we have some regular shredded cheese here in a pan along with some of our Hi-Temp Hot Pepper Cheese. The regular cheese starts melting fairly quickly whereas even at 200° the Hi-temp cheese retains its form meaning it will stay where it is supposed to be in the sausage. When you slice a sausage you made with hi-temp cheese you should see clearly defined, cubed pieces that give a great taste and a pleasing appearance to your product.

    All of our hi-temp cheese is diced into 1/4 inch pieces so all you have to do is mix them in as you are mixing in your seasoning. The best way to store this kind of cheese is under 40 degrees Fahrenheit, you should get at least 60 days shelf life under these conditions or you can freeze it for longer term storage. The general usage for hi-temp cheese is 10% of the product weight, or 1 lb of cheese to every 10 lb of meat. Some people will want more than that and some will want less depending on the product being made and personal preferences, so the 10% is a good place to start and then you can experiment from there. Hi-Temp Cheddar, Hot Pepper Cheese, Mozzarella, Swiss Cheese and now Sriracha Cheese and Hi-Temp Ghost Pepper Cheese are all available at www.waltonsinc.com

    So next time you are getting ready to make some Summer Sausage, Snack Sticks or any type of Sausage add some Hi-Temp cheese to give it a little extra taste.

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    Make sure you subscribe to WaltonsTV and remember to tap the bell next to the subscribed button to get notified about all new videos, plus like and comment on this video, and visit waltonsinc.com and meatgistics.com to find Everything But The Meat!

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    Easily subscribe to any category or topic on the Meatgistics community site by clicking the green “Subscribe” button to get an email each time a new post is made!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Hi-Temp Cheese Shop waltonsinc.com for Brat Seasoning Subscribe to WaltonsTV on YouTube PK 100 Smokehouse Pro Smoker Smokehouse Terrapin Ridge Hot Pepper Jam Hot Pepper Jam

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  • Meat Hacks: MSG and Umami, how are they related?

    Learn about MSG and it's use in meat seasonings, plus what benefits it provides to meat products with Walton's and Meatgistics. Read the guide and then post your questions or comments below.

    Umami Meat Hacks

    MSG or Monosodium Glutamate is a naturally occurring amino acid that first entered into the Mainstream consciousness back in the 80’s and 90’s when there were health debates over its use in the food industry. I am not going to try to convince you one way or the other on the health issues associated with MSG, you can easily google it and there are plenty of articles out there both for and against the use of MSG. I encourage you to do your own research if you want to know more about it. The one thing I will say is that there is strong evidence that a small percentage of people do have a bad reaction to MSG again there are differing opinions on what percentage of people it affects and you can find all sorts of statistics on both sides. Like I said, I am not going to go into the health issues, the FDA says it is okay for use in food products and that is good enough for me at this point.

    MSG works as a flavor enhancer and is commonly added to canned or packaged foods to make them taste more fresh or to increase an already present flavor. MSG is an inexpensive ingredient so it is often used in conjunction with more expensive ingredients to cut back on production costs. It is able to be used this way because to some degree MSG takes on the flavor of whatever you add it too. So say you had a recipe that called for a lot of nutmeg, well nutmeg is currently very expensive so what some companies will do is cut back on the nutmeg and add MSG. As you have probably seen we sell a few seasonings that have both an MSG Free and a normal version. If the seasoning you have been getting from us does not say MSG Free don’t worry, that does not mean it has MSG in it, it just means that if it does there is not an MSG Free version of it. Mono-sodium Glutamate has to be listed plainly as an ingredient in any seasoning that uses it so you can easily check on Waltonsinc.com by selecting the seasoning and then at the bottom clicking the additional information tab.

    You have probably heard the word Umami pop up in the past couple of years. For those of you who do not know Umami is defined as a strong meaty taste and it is now considered one of the basic flavors along with sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. If you think of it in those terms then it makes sense that there HAS to be a designation for something like Umami out there right? Would you call a steak sweet, sour, bitter, or salty? If you would then you have been cooking your steaks all wrong and you should check out our post on reverse searing a steak to see how you should be doing it! You should probably check out that post anyway as reverse searing a steak gives you a beautifully cooked steak every time. Some foods commonly said to have an umami flavor are beef, pork, chicken, some cheeses, tomatoes and mushrooms. That’s a pretty good list other than mushrooms which in my opinion should never be eaten!

    So how are MSG and Umami connected? Well you taste something with an Umami flavor through the same taste buds or receptors that you taste glutamates in. So, since MSG is a glutamate we can assume that since they are experienced through the same receptors that they will probably taste similar or at least go together right? Well we could…but by now you should know that we are NEVER going to pass up the opportunity to fire up our grill … you know … for science!

    I went out and purchased a managers special bottom round steak from the grocery store. We are going cut it in half, marinade both in the same authentic steak sauce but we are going to add MSG to one of the marinades and see which one ends up with a better taste!

    I put them both on the grill and cooked them medium rare, about 135 degrees. There is no question the one with the MSG had a better taste to it. The non MSG one was still tastier than I would have expected from a $5 steak but the one that we added MSG to was loaded with flavor.

    So, should you cook with MSG? From a flavor standpoint it is a no brainer, it makes whatever you are cooking taste better and since it is inexpensive it saves you on the final cost. From a health standpoint that is up to what you believe.

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    Make sure you subscribe to WaltonsTV and remember to tap the bell next to the subscribed button to get notified about all new videos, plus like and comment on this video, and visit waltonsinc.com and meatgistics.com to find Everything But The Meat!

    Subscribe to Meatgistics

    Easily subscribe to any category or topic on the Meatgistics community site by clicking the green “Subscribe” button to get an email each time a new post is made!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Additives Subscribe to WaltonsTV on YouTube Authentic Steakhouse Sauce Excalibur Authentic Steakhouse Sauce Mono Sodium Glutamate Excalibur Mono Sodium Glutamate

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  • Meat Hacks: How To Make Juicer Meat Products

    Learn how to make juicer meat products, what is carrot fiber, and how phosphates are used in meats with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    Meat Hacks

    How to make juicer meat products?
    We’ve all taken a bite out of a meat snack, a piece of chicken, or other meat, and the meat has been dry and unappetizing. If you want to try and avoid a dry meat product, we can do a couple things to tweak our process and include additives to help increase the water holding capacity and help us make a juicier final product. Two options we will look at today is Phosphates and Carrot Fiber. Sometimes seasoning blends meant to be used as a marinade will already include phosphates. Some additives already include phosphates like the Sure Gel Meat Binder, but it is not always included in other seasoning blends. Always check the ingredient statement on your seasoning to see if it already has phosphates included, or if you can include extra phosphate, as the maximum allowed amount of phosphate in meat products is 2 oz per 25 lb of meat. One of our favorite phosphate included seasoning blends for injecting or marinating meat is our Excalibur Butter Flavored Seasoning & Marinade. It works great on all types of proteins from beef, pork, chicken, or anything else. Using a seasoning like this with phosphates added will really help make one of the best smoked pork loins, brisket, or marinated and grilled chicken breasts that you could imagine. If you are using another seasoning or marinade that doesn’t include phosphates, you can include an additive like our Cold Phosphate, at a rate of 2 oz per 25 lb of meat, to help increase the water holding capacity in any types of meat products. Cold phosphate can be added to most seasoning blends that do not already contain phosphates, and is available in 8 oz or 5 lb packages, and it is also in 50 lb bulk cases if you are a commercial meat processor.

    What are options for meat binders to increase water holding capacity?
    Options for binders that can increase water holding capacity in a variety of sausages would be using our Sure Gel Meat Binder at a rate of 6 oz per 25 lb of meat, or use Carrot Fiber at a rate of 4 oz per 25 lb of meat, or use Soy Protein blend as a rate of 12 oz per 25 lb of meat. All of these are quite acceptable for most varieties of sausages, and smoked and cured meat products.

    How do phosphates work?
    By adding phosphates, what happens in the meat is that we increase the pH level of the meat product and move it further away from the isoelectric pH point of meat, which starts at around 5.2. As the pH moves away from that isoelectric point, the water holding capacity increases because there are more negatives protein charges for the water to bind to. Phosphates also increase the water holding capacity by increasing the space between proteins which allows for more water to enter the meat and be held in the myofibrils, by capillary forces. One last thing that phosphates can help with is in extending shelf life because they have antioxidant properties which can decrease the rate of lipid or fat oxidation in meats.

    Wrap Up
    A few final things to keep in mind is that adding phosphates, carrot fiber, or other binders and additives can increase water holding capacity, but they will not completely correct a bad cooking cycle and overcooking meats. If you marinate chicken and include phosphates, but you cook the chicken to an internal temp of 225 degrees instead of 165, you can still end up cooking out too much water and end up with a dry final product. Instead, couple the inclusion of phosphates, carrot fiber, and binders with cooking meat to the proper temperature, checking it with a meat thermometer, to achieve the best and most consistent results with the moistest, juiciest, and most flavorful product possible. And if you are making and cooking meat products at home, these additives can help you have a juicier final product, but if you are a commercial meat processor it can also increase your profit margins by adding to the overall weight of your meat products.

    To sum things up, if you want to make the moistest and juiciest meat product possible or increase your yields to increase your profit margin on meat products you are selling, make sure your seasoning blend includes an additive that can increase water holding capacity like phosphates, or when injecting seasoning and marinade use and add Cold Phosphate or Sure Gel to your injection solution, and if you are making any type of sausage you can add Carrot Fiber or Sure Gel Binder to increase your water holding capacity as well.

    Carrot Fiber

    Learn more about carrot fiber by visiting the Walton’s Blog, watch the video above, or visit waltonsinc.com
    https://meatgistics.waltonsinc.com/topic/234/meatgistics-carrot-fiber-phosphates-meat-binders
    https://www.waltonsinc.com/carrot-fiber-binder

    Subscribe to WaltonsTV

    Make sure you subscribe to WaltonsTV and remember to tap the bell next to the subscribed button to get notified about all new videos, plus like and comment on this video, and visit waltonsinc.com and meatgistics.com to find Everything But The Meat!

    Subscribe to Meatgistics

    Easily subscribe to any category or topic on the Meatgistics community site by clicking the green “Subscribe” button to get an email each time a new post is made!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Carrot Fiber Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Additives Shop waltonsinc.com for Cold Phosphate Shop waltonsinc.com for Sure Gel Binder Shop waltonsinc.com for Soy Protein Blend Subscribe to WaltonsTV on YouTube Shop Meat Additives Meat Additives Shop Carrot Fiber Carrot Fiber

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  • Summer Sausage with Encapsulated Citric Acid What is Encapsulated Citric Acid?

    Learn what encapsulated citric acid is and how to make better sausage with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the highlights here, and then post your comments or questions below.

    What Is Encapsulated Citric Acid?

    Encapsulated citric acid is simply an acidulant that is coated with a hydrogenated cotton seed oil, which will melt and dissolve once heat is applied during cooking. It is used to give sausage a tangy flavor, by lowering the pH of the meat. It is meant to be a replacement for starter cultures.

    What Use Encapsulated Citric Acid Instead Of A Starter Culture

    The quickest and easiest answer is simply for cook time. Starter cultures can take hours and hours to develop correctly during thermal processing, but Encapsulated Citric Acid performs the same basic steps in a fraction of the time.

    Why Does Citric Acid Or Other Acidulants Need To Be Encapsulated?

    When making sausage, it is vital to add an acidulant at the proper point during thermal processing. Adding it directly while mixing, or having the citric acid or other acidulant release at the wrong point can lead to a dry and crumbly sausage, caused by a break down of proteins and the “meat bind” in your product. Encapsulated Citric Acid will release only at 135° or higher to properly release at the correct time during smoking and cooking so it does not alter your sausage’s texture in a negative manner.

    Encapsulated Citric Acid What Are Other Benefits Of Encapsulated Citric Acid?

    One of the big benefits that we already covered is a decreased cook time, but we also get some other general benefits of having a lower pH in cured sausages. By lowering the pH of the meat product and increasing the acidity, we will change the flavor of the meat or sausage and give it that tangy flavor many people associate with meat snacks like summer sausage or snack sticks. A lower pH will also help us enhance a meat product’s shelf-life. By reaching a certain pH level, we can attempt to even create a shelf-stable product (shelf-stability can also partially be dependent upon a product’s water activity). Encapsulated Citric Acid is also going to help control bacteria growth, and prevent pathogens or other microorganisms from growing by creating an environment in the sausage that is unfavorable for growth. Lastly, it will also act as a cure accelerator, which decreases the required hold time of a sausage before or during thermal processing, and it speeds up the conversion of nitrites into nitric oxide which is what gives cured meats their pink tinted color and cured meat flavor.

    How To Use Encapsulated Citric Acid? Do NOT regrind sausage after mixing in encapsulated citric acid Do NOT hold the product for an extended period of time or save partial batches for further processing later (encapsulate could break or dissolve overtime, releasing citric acid at the wrong time) IF you ignore rules 1 & 2, you can still successfully make and eat your sausage safely and it will be totally edible, but it just won’t have the same or correct end result Always wait until the last 60 seconds or so of your mixing cycle to add encapsulated citric acid so you don’t over mix or break the encapsulates, and you just need to mix long enough to evenly disperse During thermal processing, make sure you maintain an internal product temperature of 135° or higher for 1 hour. This will ensure the encapsulate has plenty of time to melt, dissolve, and thus release the citric acid. Use 4 oz per 25 lb of meat for achieving a product with a pH low enough to potentially be shelf-stable. You may use less than 4 oz though if you do not like as strong of a tangy flavor in your cured meats. Watch WaltonsTV: Encapsulated Citric Acid Product Overview Shop waltonsinc.com for Encapsulated Citric Acid Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Additives Shop waltonsinc.com for Excalibur Sausage & Jerky Seasoning

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  • WaltonsTV: Using Cure Accelerators In Making Sausage Meat Hacks: Using Cure Accelerators In Making Sausage

    Watch the full video below, read the highlights here, and then post your comments or questions below.

    Benefits of Using Cure Accelerators In Making Sausage

    A lot of our recipes from Walton’s and Meatgistics call for a 12 hour holding period when making cured sausage. What this does is allow the cure to begin working before you begin thermal processing, cooking, and smoking. However, if you want to skip this step, and proceed directly to smoking after processing or stuffing into casings, you can use a cure accelerator to avoid that holding period. Multiple different types are available at waltonsinc.com. One key point to remember though is that if you are using a cure accelerator in a pickle or brine, do not save any leftovers. Only mix what you need for immediate usage and discard any and all leftovers. You should also avoid any direct contact or storage with cure accelerators and cure or nitrites. Lastly, another big benefit of using a cure accelerator is to improve your meat products flavor stability and it promotes an extended shelf life.

    What Kind of Cure Accelerators Are Available? Smoked Meat Stabilizer - One of the easiest options for homemade sausage, but it cannot be used in pickle or brine Sodium Erythorbate - The most popular used option overall in the meat industry Cure Excellerator - Excalibur Seasoning’s customized blend of Sodium Erythorbate and Sodium Citrate that is faster acting than pure Sodium Erythorbate Encapsulated Citric Acid - This is what is typically used in making summer sausage and snack sticks to provide a tangy flavor, but it also acts as a cure accelerator

    So if you want to skip the 12 hour holding period when making cured meats between processing and cooking, simply use a cure accelerator, and get the added benefits of flavor stability and a potentially better shelf life.

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Encapsulated Citric Acid Shop waltonsinc.com for Smoked Meat Stabilizer Shop waltonsinc.com for Sodium Erythorbate Shop waltonsinc.com for Cure Excellerator Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Additives

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