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  • Meat Hacks: The importance of properly packaging your Snack Sticks.

    Learn about the importance of properly packaging your Snack Sticks with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    Meat Hacks

    The importance of properly packaging your Snack Sticks
    When made correctly Snack Sticks can be a near shelf stable product. One important factor in how long your snack sticks will keep is making sure they are dry when they get packaged. Any moisture that is trapped inside the bags can cause mold to grow which will destroy your product, so make sure that your snack sticks have been dried before you package them.

    Another thing you want to make sure of before packaging your snack sticks is that they are cool, a warm snack stick, even if the outside is dry, will cause moisture to build up on the inside of the bag which will end up causing the same issue as packaging a wet snack stick.

    Subscribe to WaltonsTV

    Make sure you subscribe to WaltonsTV and remember to tap the bell next to the subscribed button to get notified about all new videos, plus like and comment on this video, and visit waltonsinc.com and meatgistics.com to find Everything But The Meat!

    Subscribe to Meatgistics

    Easily subscribe to any category or topic on the Meatgistics community site by clicking the green “Subscribe” button to get an email each time a new post is made!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Snack Stick Seasonings Shop waltonsinc.com for Stuffers Subscribe to WaltonsTV on YouTube Smoked Collagen 17mm Smoked Collagen for Snack Sticks Chambered Vacuum Bags Weston Meat Mixers

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  • Meat Hacks: Stop Crushing Vacuum Sealed Foods

    Learn how to stop crushing bratwursts, fresh sausage, and other foods when vacuum packaging with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    Meat Hacks

    How to stop crushing vacuum sealed foods?
    A question we get a lot is “How do I keep bratwursts or other fresh sausage from getting crushed and flattened when I vacuum package them?” The answer to this is extremely simple, but one that a lot of people don’t initially think of. After making brats or any other fresh sausage, if you go straight to the vacuum sealer, the lack of pressure in the bag will cause the bag to collapse onto the sausage and flatten it out, making it have an awful appearance. They still taste great, but we also want them to look great! Instead of immediately vacuum packaging, throw the sausage into your freezer on a tray, plate, or meat lug, then go back to cleaning up your sausage stuffer, and prep areas. After about an hour, you can go back to the freezer, grab the brats or sausage, and begin vacuum packaging. Even if you can’t wait a full hour or more, even just 15-30 minutes in the freezer can help. All we are trying to do is begin to freeze the outside layer of the sausage and get them to crisp up a little bit and that slightly hardened exterior then won’t collapse under the pressure of the vacuum sealer, allowing you to keep perfectly shaped brats or sausage and the absolute best appearance until you’re ready to grill and eat them!

    Subscribe to WaltonsTV

    Make sure you subscribe to WaltonsTV and remember to tap the bell next to the subscribed button to get notified about all new videos, plus like and comment on this video, and visit waltonsinc.com and meatgistics.com to find Everything But The Meat!

    Subscribe to Meatgistics

    Easily subscribe to any category or topic on the Meatgistics community site by clicking the green “Subscribe” button to get an email each time a new post is made!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealing Bags Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealers Subscribe to WaltonsTV on YouTube Shop Vacuum Pouches Walton's Vacuum Sealing Bags and Pouches Shop Vacuum Sealers Vacuum Sealers from ARY, Weston, and Promarks

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  • Meat Hacks: Packaging Meat After Cooking

    Learn the steps to follow when packaging meat products after smoking or cooking with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    Meat Hacks

    How to package meat products after cooking
    Whenever you cook meat snacks like smoked sausage, jerky, snack sticks, or any other smoked and cured meats, there are a couple steps we recommend following before packaging. First, cool the product immediately after your smoking and thermal processing is done. You should NOT cover the product while it is cooling down, so you can prevent condensation from forming and so that the outside of the meat product can be dry, especially if you used a cold water shower or bath as part of your cooling process you’ll want the product exterior to dry out before packaging. Once you’ve cooled the meat products, you should then let them sit out at room temp for 1 to 2 hours before packaging to begin equalizing with the ambient room temp so you again don’t have condensation begin to form. For a product like snack sticks or jerky where shelf stability is the goal, you can also lose shelf stability when moisture is introduced into the packaged product because moisture creates an environment where mold can potentially grow. Snack sticks and jerky are also meant to have a lower water activity and if you do not let the product cool before packaging and condensation forms in the package or the outside of the meat snack, then you won’t have the same effect and ability for a longer storage time without some packages and product going bad, growing mold, etc. Another benefit to removing moisture from the product and preventing condensation before packaging for meat snacks with casings is to prevent small ice crystals from forming and going through multiple freeze and thaw cycles which can actually separate the casings from the meat and in turn also lose the snap or bite the casing helps add to the meat snacks when biting and eating.

    To sum things up, when you are ready to package your meat snacks or other products, the product to be packaged should have a dry exterior and should be equalizing with the ambient room temperature so you can avoid moisture on the product or condensation build up in the package, which will help with your overall product quality, reduce chances for mold to grow, and help products with casings stay intact if they are frozen and thawed.

    Subscribe to WaltonsTV

    Make sure you subscribe to WaltonsTV and remember to tap the bell next to the subscribed button to get notified about all new videos, plus like and comment on this video, and visit waltonsinc.com and meatgistics.com to find Everything But The Meat!

    Subscribe to Meatgistics

    Easily subscribe to any category or topic on the Meatgistics community site by clicking the green “Subscribe” button to get an email each time a new post is made!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealing Bags Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealers Subscribe to WaltonsTV on YouTube Shop Vacuum Pouches Walton's Vacuum Sealing Bags and Pouches Shop Vacuum Sealers Vacuum Sealers from ARY, Weston, and Promarks

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  • Difference Between Chamber and Non-Chambered Vacuum Sealing Difference Between Chamber and Non-Chambered Vacuum Sealing

    Learn what the difference between chamber and non-chambered vacuum sealers, along with the different vacuum sealer bags, and when to use which ones with Walton's and Meatgistics. Read the highlights here, and then post your comments or questions below.

    VacMaster VP215 Chamber Vacuum Sealer What Is A Chamber Vacuum Sealer?

    A chambered vacuum sealer is a vacuum sealer where the entire vacuum pouch is placed inside of the vacuum sealer and when the lid closes and the vacuum process begins the air is remove from from inside the machine and the pouch is fully enclosed by the machine and lid. The VacMaster VP215 is a great example of a small chamber vacuum sealer. Chambered Vacuum Sealers come in a ton of different options and varieties. From as inexpensive as the VacMaster VP112S Vacuum Sealer at less than $500 all the way to a Promarks DC-900 Double Chamber Swing Lid Vacuum Sealer that costs $24,000. For a vacuum sealer at home, Walton’s recommends the VacMaster VP215 Vacuum Sealer. At just over $700, this vacuum sealer is hard to beat. For a commercial unit, it is a little bit harder to say which unit is best because it really depends on your volume and capacity. Walton’s does promote and really like the quality and functionality of the Promarks Vacuum Sealers for any type of commercial application though.

    Weston Pro-3000 Non-Chambered Vacuum Sealer What Is A Non-Chambered Vacuum Sealer?

    A non-chambered vacuum sealer is a vacuum sealer where only the end of the bag is place inside the vacuum sealer. Once the vacuum is turned on, most of the bag remains outside the vacuum sealing chamber and air is pulled out of the bag by small channels in the vacuum pouch. These types of units are typically very inexpensive and great for all kinds of applications at home. These types of units would not be suggested for commercial applications though. If a more commercial application was needed though with a non-chambered vacuum sealer, we would recommend going with a top of the line Weston Pro-3000 Vacuum Sealer. The Weston Pro-3000 is a great machine and will last for a long time under typical usage scenarios, and is recommended for anyone who wants a non-chambered machine with the utmost quality and reliability. For the casual user, or for occasionally vacuum sealing a few leftovers or just a few vac pouches at a time, the Weston Harvest Guard Vacuum Sealer is a great entry-level unit. It is quite inexpensive, but still retains a higher quality than many other brands and cheaper units we’ve run into. I use the Weston Harvest Guard Vacuum Sealer myself for home use and sealing leftovers from lunch/dinner and then I use the Weston Pro-1100 in the WaltonsTV Video Studio for packaging food and meat items we create and test with in there. Overall, we really like the Weston brand of vacuum sealers and they are great machines for their price point and performance as non-chambered units.

    Waltons Chamber Vacuum Sealer Bags What Vacuum Pouches work with Chamber Vacuum Sealers?

    All vacuum pouches! Chambered machines will work with any type of vacuum pouch, regardless of brand or style. That is the great thing about Chamber Vacuum Sealers in that you aren’t stuck using only a special type of bag like the non-chambered units require. And, with Chamber Vacuum Sealers, you also get the added benefit of having multiple options available. Instead of just plain 3-mil Vac Pouches, you can also get 4-mil Vac Pouches, 5-mil Vac Pouches, Zippered Vac Pouches, Windowed Vac Pouches, Boilable Vac Pouches, Safe Handling Printed Vac Pouches, and Gold Foil Vac Pouches.

    Weston Non-Chambered Vacuum Sealer Bags What Vacuum Pouches work with NON-Chambered Vacuum Sealers?

    Only vacuum pouches with a textured interior. Sometimes referred to as “full-mesh bags” or “textured bags” or “non-chambered bags”. Almost all vacuum sealer bags that have a textured interior are compatible with any brand of FoodSaver®, Weston®, VacMaster®, or Ziploc® heat-seal vacuum systems (and other brands). Walton’s offer vacuum sealer bags with the textured interior from both Weston and VacMaster. I personally use the Weston bags, but both types of brands of bags from Walton’s will work with any brand of non-chambered vacuum sealers.

    Why Should I Choose Chamber or Non-Chambered Vacuum Sealers & Bags

    First off, whichever machine you have, buy the right type of bags for it. If you have a chamber machine, it will still work fine with the non-chambered (textured interior) bags, but the actual Chamber Vacuum Sealer Bags will be less expensive. Then, if you are still trying to choose between the styles, consider this… Initial costs will be less expensive on the “non-chambered” units, but more expensive on the bags over time. The machines cost less and it’s easier to start off by buying a non-chambered vacuum sealer but buying a chamber vacuum sealer will save you money because chamber vacuum sealer bags are a fraction of the cost of their non-chambered counterparts. Non-chambered vacuum sealers cost less than chamber vacuum sealers, but chamber vacuum sealer bags cost less than non-chambered (textured interior) vacuum sealer bags.

    What Is The Price Comparison Between The Two Types of Vacuum Sealers & Bags?

    Example: If you average using 10 bags a week to seal leftovers from dinner or package a few batches of jerky and snack sticks from time to time, then you’d use 520 bags in 1 year. That cost in 8x12 bags for the non-chambered type would cost you about $95. The same quantity of bags, but for a chamber vacuum sealers would cost about $29. That’s almost a $70 difference. Multiply that out over 5 years of use, and add in the cost of buying a vacuum sealer of either type…
    Weston Pro-1100 ($250) plus vacuum pouches ($475) equals a total cost over 5 years of $725.
    VacMaster VP215 ($710) plus vacuum pouches ($145) equals a total cost over 5 years of $855.
    From that, you can see that the cost of vacuum sealer bags are really a great equalizer over the long run, and the total cost of ownership between non-chambered and chamber vacuum sealers is really quite close.

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealers Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealer Bags & Pouches Shop waltonsinc.com for Vacuum Sealing Accessories Buy Chamber Vacuum Sealer Bags Walton's 100 Count Chamber Vacuum Sealer Bags Buy Non-Chamber Vacuum Sealer Bags Weston Vacuum Sealer Bags

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