Invest in New & High Quality Equipment


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    WaltonsTV: Invest in Equipment

    Meat Hacks: Invest in New & High Quality Meat Processing Equipment

    Watch the full video below, read the highlights here, and then post your comments or questions below.

    Invest in New & High Quality Meat Processing Equipment

    First of all, don’t take this as just a sale pitch. While Walton’s would love you to buy all new equipment from us each year, this is really meant to help you make better meat snacks and produce a higher quality product. Newer equipment and higher quality equipment does make a HUGE difference in meat processing. We hear from people all the time that are using a 30-40 year old meat grinder, and they seem proud of the fact that they’ve made it last that long, and while it might be impressive that it is still running that long, we can almost guarantee it is no longer producing a high quality product. The head and auger on an old grinder like that will no longer fit correctly after extended years of use. Grinder parts, plus all other meat processing equipment parts do wear out over time. Worn out parts will cause a lower quality meat grind and a sub-par final product. Other people may be using a meat grinder at home that is simply an attachment for a kitchen stand mixer and while it does work in grinding meat, it is very poor at producing a high quality grind and is very inefficient at grinding as well. Another key point in meat grinding is to keep a sharp plate and knife, plus always use the same grinder plate and knife together can really be helpful. Another related point relates to whether you should use a meat grinder to stuff sausage. Meat grinders can be used as a sausage stuffer, but buying a true and dedicated sausage stuffer can really help make a more consistently stuffed sausage. Grinders will typically “smear” meat as you try to stuff sausage into casings and overwork the meat which leads to a loss of color and particle definition. So actually using a sausage stuffer is preferred over just stuffing from a meat grinder. Lastly, looking at meat mixing, you can hand mix many meat products but when you are trying to make a cured sausage that needs a lot of protein extraction is is hard to get an adequate mix by only hand mixing. Investing in a quality meat mixer can really help in your protein extraction (and thus your binding and consistency in your final product) plus reduce the amount of time you spend in your mixing cycle.

    So make sure you are taking care of your equipment, following maintenance schedules, and investing in new equipment and parts, to make the highest quality meat products!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Grinders

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Grinder Plates & Knives

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Mixers

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Sausage Stuffers


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  • @papasop I have a response from the manufacturer…
    They said that they designed the mixer in a way that it would not need to run in reverse for a long time. It should mix efficiently enough in one direction and it was designed to mix in just 1 direction. So, using the grinder in any scenario (grinding or mixing) you should limit the reverse time to approximately 5 seconds at one time.

    My own opinion on the mixing is that I wouldn’t mix in just 1 direction though. I think there is still a benefit to going in reverse, even if temporarily, so I think my course of action for the future will probably be to mix 90% of the time in 1 direction, but still do the reverse in the 5 second interval. Probably something like 30 to 60 seconds forward, 5 seconds backward, then another 30 to 60 forward, etc… I think that would get enough benefit of a direction mix cycle, but still limit the reverse action as much as possible.

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  • @jonathon Moscow Mules!! I’m sold. Will It BBQ is on the way soon for sure!

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  • @alan Lol, I’m an idiot, just the other day I said that I am fully capable of thinking one thing and typing something else! Getting information from an old timer is usually a great way to go! Glad you got it worked out though! Send pictures of them!

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  • @Danbow Back when I was in customer service I know I talked to someone who either said his wife did it exactly how you are explaining it or I talked to the woman who did it, I wonder if I was talking to either you or your wife?!

    Wrapping it in foil would keep more moisture in the product, same basic process that some people do when they are smoking ribs. I can absolutely see how this would work and I think the way she is doing it, without a casing, would be more effective when wrapping it in foil. I don’t think you’ll ever convert me from using a casing but we might be making some updates here and when we do I might have access to an oven and will give this a try!

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  • A

    Lol, no rice in Andoullie. You are thinking of Boudin.
    I spoke to an Old Timer Cajun down here and he said, after you cure your meat for 24 hours, spray and moisten the meat just before stuffing it. If the stuffing is too dry, the meat will shrink when smoked and it will make voids between the stuffing and casing.
    The recipe I use is hundred plus years ago and I added some modern safeguards and seasonings. By the way, I use Boston Butt & Cushion Meat, in lieu of the hogs head and neck.
    The Smoke Houses are selling it for over $10 a pound here and I can make it for $1.30.
    LaPlace, LA is, The Andoullie Capital of the World!

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  • H

    @jonathon Thank you for your quick and detailed response. It is greatly appreciated. Just another reason why Walton’s is the best. For some reason, I thought that you needed to soak the collagen before loading it on the stuffing horn. Thanks for the correction there.

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