How To Make Homemade Jerky - Recipe


  • Admin

    How to Make Homemade Jerky

    How To Make Homemade Jerky

    Learn how to make homemade jerky with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    What Is Jerky?

    In a simple definition, jerky is just dried meat. Jerky can be a whole muscle or ground and restructured product. Seasoned strips of meat are cured and dried in an oven, dehydrator, grill, smoker, or smokehouse. Whole muscle is made by slicing a whole cut of meat into thin strips, while restructured jerky is a ground and formed product that is extruded into strips, by something like our All-Around Jerky Maker. Be prepared for a 50-75% loss in the weight of the product once it is completely cooked and dried. Use meats that are extremely lean, with as little of fat as possible. Inside round is Walton’s preferred cut of meat to use, and we recommend slicing against the grain of the meat.

    Laying Jerky Strips In Dehydrator

    Meat Block

    25lb beef inside round (or other whole muscle meat)

    Additives

    1 package Excalibur Jerky Seasoning
    1oz Sure Cure (packet included with seasoning)
    40oz Water (8oz per 5lb of meat)

    Whole Muscle Jerky Process

    Mix seasoning and sure cure packet together. Sprinkle seasoning and cure mixture over slices of meat, or drag slices through seasoning mixture. After seasoning and cure are applied, place jerky strips into a poly bag and add just enough water to cover the meat, and help it marinate. Hold the jerky meat strips in the refrigerator overnight or about 12 hours.

    Restructured Jerky Process

    Mix seasoning and sure cure packet together. If not already using ground meat, grind meat 1 additional time through a 1/8in grinder plate, mix seasoning, cure, and water into meat until evening dispersed. Then, extrude using the All-Around Jerky Maker and Walton’s Sausage Stuffer.

    Thermal Processing

    Lay seasoned jerky strips on jerky screens or smoke screens and place in smoker, smokehouse, oven, or dehydrator to cook.
    130F for 1 hour (open damper on smoker)
    145F for 2 hours (2/3 closed damper on smoker)
    175F until internal meat temp of 160F

    Walton's Homemade How To Make Jerky Recipe

    Cooling

    Hold at room temp for 1-2 hours before moving to the refrigerator/freezer. After we are totally done with the cooling process, then we will package in vacuum pouches for longer term storage.

    Wrap up

    It’s easy to get the basics on making homemade jerky, but practice does make perfect. Walton’s has everything you need (except the meat) to make great jerky, plus we have the knowledge to help you perfect your own process.
    If you have any questions or need help in your process, please share your questions or comments below.

    Other Notes

    If your smoker, smokehouse, dehydrator, or oven cannot reach temperatures as low as 130F, just start as low as possible and slowly increase the temperature over time

    Watch WaltonsTV: How To Make Homemade Jerky

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Jerky Seasonings

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Jerky Making Supplies

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Dehydrators



  • How do you keep it from being so dried out?


  • Walton's Employee

    @cwerts We recently did an experiment with this where we were trying to mimic popular jerky treats that are shelf stable but still very tender. The one thing we noticed from looking at ingredients was they all had large amounts of sugar, far more than normal jerky would have. We did a video and posted the results How to Make Tender Jerky At Home that explains it pretty well. If you are looking for a base seasoning to use Walton’s Bold Jerky was what we used and I think it worked the best of any of the jerky seasonings we tried. We are working with Excalibur to create a seasoning that would give you a similar result to what we achieved without adding any extra sugar, it will already be mixed in!



  • @jonathon I was wondering the same thing. Thanks for the info.



  • I grounded 25# of deer meat I mixed in the Colorado seasoning in the meat and grounded it again but I didn’t add water first time using product from Walton’s do you need to add water?


  • Walton's Employee

    @gusmanp Sorry for the delay in responding. The only real reason I would add water to a restructured product would be to make mixing and extruding easier, other than that it isn’t necessary. When I make restructured jerky I like to use smoked meat stabilizer so I can go right to the smoker, and when using that you don’t really want to add water or it can gas out so quickly that it can cause issues.

    Hope that helps!





Recent Posts

  • E

    Here is a link to a website that has a handy Excel spreadsheet. It is, as it says a free non-commercial site.
    As for Waltons dropping the ball, I vote they are doing a great job.
    I think for all of us there are general guidelines, but unless you have a temperature and humidity controlled environment, both for the preparation, cooking (if you cook them) smoking, hanging etc, the results are bound to vary from batch to batch.
    Personally, I am searching how to get my home made smoked and dry cured pepperoni to the exact texture and firmness of Margarita pepperoni from the store.
    Through trial and error I have the flavor where I want it, but not the texture or firmness. I know time, temperature and humidity are all crucial, but the best I can do is in the basement and then subject to the environment that is there.
    I figure as long as I am not killing anyone or making anyone sick I am making progress. Thanks Waltons for all of the great information so far.
    Having said that, it would be nice to have your chart in an Excel spreadsheet.

    read more
  • K

    @jonathon

    Thanks Jonathon! One question tho! You eluded to 178 being high for a temp! Don’t you guys recommend setting the temp at 175 during the final stage to completion to internal temp? Three degrees shouldn’t make that much difference should it??

    read more
  • K

    @lamurscrappy

    Sounds reasonable. Thanks for your input. Pulling the meat at 152 will make a big difference I bet! Thanks again.

    read more
  • @Kinger Thanks for the information. Your process, other than going to 178, is on in my mind. The only thing I do differently is an ice bath for 20 minutes. Showering for 10 minutes, if you are running a cycle and a fan in your smoker can work, but I still think an ice bath would bring it down faster and more. Last time I did thick summer sausage it was down to 110 in 20 minutes, I also tried showering it at 2 minutes on 2 minutes off for 20 minutes and it was only down to 136 (ish) but i did not have a fan running on them.

    One more thing you might want to try, if you are stalled towards the end you can finish them up by putting them in a vacuum bag (I have done then hot, right from the smoker, some condensation in the bag but it still gets a good vac) and get some water going at around 165, it should get up to temp in under an hour depending on the thickness.

    read more
  • @Newbe There might be some breaking down of the meat but this shouldnt cause you too many issues. I have bought pork butts fresh, then froze them then processed and froze the product again. The taste might not be the BEST possible but it certainly wont be bad.

    read more
  • @vjbutler no problem let us know

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