How To Make Homemade Hot Dogs - Recipe


  • Admin

    How to Make Homemade Hot Dogs

    How To Make Homemade Hot Dogs

    Watch the full video below, read the highlights here, and then post your comments or questions below.

    What Is A Hot Dog?

    Hot dogs, frankfurters, wieners, or whatever name you are familiar with…Is just a sausage with a very small meat particle size, typically emulsified to where the fat and lean particles in the meat are basically indistinguishable from one another. Hot Dogs can be made from beef, pork, chicken, poultry, wild game, or a combination of meats. Another staple feature of hot dogs is to make a skinless product. This is usually done by using a cellulose casing, and then stripping it off of the final product, but this is not a requirement and collagen casings or natural casings can still be used.

    Walton's Homemade How To Make Hot Dogs Recipe

    Meat Block

    25lb 80/20 beef trim

    Additives

    1 package Excalibur Hot Dog Seasoning
    1oz Sure Cure (packet included with seasoning)
    6oz Sure Gel Meat Binder
    2oz Smoked Meat Stabilizer
    2 to 3 lb High Temperature Cheese (optional)
    26mm Cellulose Hot Dog Casings
    2 Quarts Ice Cold Water

    Process

    Grind the meat 3 times. 1st through a 3/8in (10mm) grinder plate, then the 2nd and 3rd grind will be done with a 1/8in (3mm) grinder plate.
    Always use a sharp grinder knife and plate to help retain a better particle definition, color, and help prevent any smearing of the meat.

    Meat Mixing

    Using a meat mixer is preferred to hand mixing when making hot dogs. Many other products like a fresh bratwurst can be adequately mixed by hand, but we need to make sure we get a lot of protein extraction for hot dogs. That is a bit more difficult to achieve in hand mixing but still a possibility to do if you don’t have an actual meat mixer. We are going to mix for about 8 minutes in total. When you start the mixer, just start adding all the ingredients, except the High Temp Cheese. This last ingredient can be added in the last 45-60 seconds of the cycle, or just long enough to evenly disperse. Over mixing the cheese can lead to smearing and loss of shape. When you are done mixing the product should be extremely sticking, which means you are getting a lot of protein extraction.

    Sausage Stuffing

    Load your sausage stuffer and be careful not to create air pockets. Begin stuffing until the casings are full with a smooth exterior. Stuff into as long of ropes as possible, and then you can cut them to length when you are ready to place them in a smokehouse or oven.

    Stuffing Homemade Hot Dogs Into Cellulose Casings

    Processing Notes

    Whenever possible, try to separate the lean meat from the fat prior to grinding and mixing. Mix all of the seasoning in with the half of the lean meat and don’t add the remaining lean meat and fat until the second half of the mixing cycle. This will give you a temporarily higher salt content in the meat which will help with the emulsification of protein in the meat and the binding of the rest of the meat, fat, and water in the final product.
    (If you do not use a cure accelerator like Smoked Meat Stabilizer, then hold in a refrigerator for approximately 12 hours or overnight before cooking)

    Thermal Processing

    Either hang on smoke sticks or lay on racks in your smokehouse or oven. Just be sure to leave a slight gap between the snack sticks. A simple cooking schedule you can follow is here:
    120F for 15 minutes
    130F for 30 minutes
    140F for 30 minutes
    150F for 30 minutes
    175F until internal meat temp of 150F and hold temp for 5 minutes (or 160F)
    (keep humidty as high as possible; add water pan to smokehouse)

    Cooling & Stripping Casings

    To help prevent wrinkling we need to shower the hot dogs when they are done cooking or put them in an ice water bath. It should only take around 10-15 minutes to get the temperature to drop down. After they are cool, you can easily strip the cellulose casings off the hot dogs. Then, we’ll let them set out for about 1 hour before moving to the refrigerator/freezer. After we are totally done with the cooling process, then we will package in vacuum pouches for longer term storage.

    Grilled Homemade Hot Dogs

    Wrap up

    Walton’s has everything you need (except the meat) to make great hot dogs at home, plus we have the knowledge to help you perfect your own processes. If you have any questions or need help in your process, please share your questions or comments below.

    Other Notes

    Place a small pan of water in the bottom of smokehouse during entire cooking cycle to help increase humidity
    If your smoker, smokehouse, dehydrator, or oven cannot reach temperatures as low as 120F, just start as low as possible and slowly increase the temperature over time

    Watch WaltonsTV: How To Make Homemade Hot Dogs

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Cellulose Sausage Casings

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Collagen & Natural Casings

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Hot Dog Seasoning

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Sausage Stuffers



  • I’m going to make some hot dogs and bologna this weekend using the hot dog and bologna seasoning, am I understanding it right that I can mix the whole batch up the same and stuff some into hot dog casings and some into the bologna chub? I’ll be using venison, should I add 15% beef fat?

    Thanks for the help,
    Chad


  • Walton's Employee

    @weatherbow21 I’d go a little higher than 15%, closer to 20-25% for taste and consistency. If you can find it, pork fat works better than beef fat as it has a creaminess to it that other animal fats can’t quite match. Now, having said that, beef fat will absolutely work too!

    Yes you are correct in how you are planning on just switching out casings. The only thing I want to point out is that after you have stuffed them into the casings they need to be held in a refrigerator overnight unless you are using a Cure Accelerator such as Encapsulated Citric Acid, Sodium Erythorbate or Excalibur’s Cure Excellerator.





Recent Posts

  • W

    I believe the recommended curing time is 12 hours but can I go less than that? I was expecting my order to be here tonight and it won’t be here till tomorrow morning now.

    I was going to mix up my batch of jerky tonight but will have to do it tomorrow on my lunch break. Just wondering if tomorrow evening would be long enough to let the meat cure.

    Thanks,

    Weston

    read more
  • M

    Your recipe calls for 1. Sure Cure, 2. Sure Gel Meat Binder, and 3. Smoked Meat Stabilizer. I have all but the Sure Gel Meat Binder. Can I get by without using this? Second question- Is Excalibur’s Cure Excellerator the same as Sure Cure?

    read more
  • @andyman Great question, Carrot Fiber holds up to 26 times its weight in water, and while the 80 oz is still well inside that I have never done that before. I max out (even with Carrot Fiber) at 64 oz which is 2 qts. My only fear with doing 80 is that it might take a lot longer to cook as it will have more water content that will be trying to evaporate. Most of that water should be bound up in the carrot fiber though so it wouldn’t really be available to be cooked out. Hmmm, my recommendation, to be safe is to stick with 64 oz of water.

    Now, as to should you add more seasoning, some people will taste the difference if you did not add additional seasonings and some (most) will not. Your water and your seasoning is technically part of your meat block (anyone who is reading this who doesn’t consider this don’t worry!) so adjusting your meat block to include your water is sometimes done. If you do decide to add more spices or seasonings I would add aromatics and things like Rosemary and Basil, don’t add more salt as that is formulated specifically for the meat block.

    Hope this helps and if you do decide to go with 80 oz of water then I would be very interested in the results!

    read more
  • D

    i use denuded round. higher cost, less waste, cleaner eating

    read more
  • @twigg267 I did a meatgistics university article on this topic, you can view it Jerky 103 - Best Cuts For Jerky and read the article! Let me know if you have more questions beyond what is available there!

    read more
  • A

    @jonathon I enjoyed this line of questions and comments, it made me think. Here is my related question: Assume I use 25 lbs. of meat to make summer sausage and add one package, 4 oz., of Carrot Fiber and 80 oz. of water. The ratio is 20 times the weight of water to the weight of CF. In other words, I am adding 5 lbs. 4 oz. of water/CF paste to my meat dough. Should I adjust the amount of salt and spices, I add to the dough? I am concerned that the flavor will be weaker if I don’t add spices for the new total, 30 lbs. curious as to what y’all thinking.

    read more

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