Excalibur Seasoning: Part 3 - SQF Level 3 Food Safety Certification


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    Excalibur Seasoning & John Brewer

    Excalibur Seasoning: Part 3 - SQF Level 3 Food Safety Certification

    Learn about Excalibur Seasoning and why you should trust them to blend your seasonings. In part 3, you'll get answers to frequently asked questions about Excalibur Seasoning's SQF Level 3 Food Safety Certifications. Watch the video, read the highlights here, and then post your comments or questions below.

    Summary

    In this episode we talked with John Brewer, the VP of Sales & Marketing at Excalibur Seasoning, about Excalibur Seasoning’s SQF Level 3 certification, organic, and food safety certifications

    What does SQF stand for?

    Safe Quality Food

    What is SQF certification all about?

    An insurance policy for the customer, that the product that comes out of the Excalibur Seasoning facility is a safe food product of the utmost quality and is safe for food consumption. It falls under a GFSI umbrella (Global Food Safety Initiative) which ensure that with their SQF Excalibur products can be sold anywhere in the world and the SQF certification is recognized as a global standard.

    What else does it mean to be SQF Level 3 certified?

    Documentation! Everything is documented, as far as what goes into a seasoning blend, all inputs are lot coded and documented. From a traceability standpoint, if a customer has a recall, Excalibur can isolate that recall versus having a customer have to recall thousands of pounds of product, or minimize the recall as much as possible, based upon what input went into the product.

    What other certifications does Excalibur Seasoning have?

    They are Organic certified and Kosher certified. On the organic side, they continue to get more and more requests and they can develop new organic blends, but they also already have an established catalog of organic blends available.

    Is there an auditing process to be SQF Level 3 certified?

    Yes, and it must be completed by a 3rd party auditor. That auditor comes into the Excalibur Seasoning facility and grades their facility and manufacturing process.

    What grade has Excalibur received during their SQF Level 3 certification?

    Excalibur has never received below an “A” grade (90% or above) on their certification. And, historically, they’ve been in the high 90’s. So they are a top of the line, grade A, SQF Level 3 facility.

    What if you fail an SQF audit?

    If you fail an audit, you are no longer certified, and don’t simply step down to the next available grade or level. So for Excalibur to receive a continual A grade at the SQF Level 3 certification means that they are maintaining that high level of documentation and food safety protocols on an on-going basis. Excalibur has never even came close to not meeting their grade and maintaining their SQF Level 3 certification.

    Is Excalibur Seasoning focused on quality and safety, or just quickly putting out a low-cost option?

    Excalibur Seasoning is highly focused on producing a safe and high quality product. As exemplified by their commitment to maintain an SQF Level 3 certification, they will never be a low-cost provider. Based upon their specifications and SQF certification, and regulatory requirements, they have added a ton of staff and man power to maintain their certification and produce high quality products.

    Why would you not want a low-cost provider?

    Low-cost providers are typically using the cheapest materials available for inputs into their products, and the cheapest is not always the best. You do get what you pay for, and if you are buying the cheapest thing available, there is probably a reason for it. The cheapest is not always the best.

    What kind of value is there in Excalibur Seasoning products?

    For what Excalibur Seasoning offers, their certifications, their customer service, and the specifications required in their raw materials, they are a bargain in the industry when comparing their total package and price for what you get when you are buying an Excalibur Seasoning product.

    Where can more information about SQF certification be found?

    You can visit the SQF website at www.sqfi.com, or contact us here on the Meatgistics site or at waltonsinc.com if you have any further questions about the Excalibur Seasoning products and their food safety certifications.


    Shop waltonsinc.com for Excalibur Seasoning





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    @parksider I am using fibrous casings and soaking in warm water for alt least 30 minutes. I mixed the meat, 20 pounds for about 12 minutes. The casings were tight when I was stuffing them. I was processing at 125 for 1 hour, 140 for 1 hour, 155 for 2 hours and 170 until the internal was 165. I water bathed them, forgot to hang them over night, but just put them in the refrigerator. I didn’t take the internal temp after I water bathed them.
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