Excalibur Seasoning: Part 4 - Private Label Seasonings


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    Excalibur Seasoning & John Brewer

    Excalibur Seasoning: Part 4 - Private Label Seasonings

    Learn about Excalibur Seasoning and why you should trust them to blend your seasonings. In part 4, you'll get answers to frequently asked questions about private labeled seasonings. Watch the video, read the highlights here, and then post your comments or questions below.

    Summary

    In this episode we talked with John Brewer, the VP of Sales & Marketing at Excalibur Seasoning, about their Private Label Seasoning Program and what the details are involved with private labeled seasonings.

    Does Excalibur Seasoning offer a Private Label Seasoning Program?

    Yes. It’s a great option for independent butcher shops, but also available and cost efficient for anyone out there with a seasoning product that they want to sell or distribute as their own private seasoning line.

    What is the minimum for private label seasoning shakers or sauces?

    No minimums if it is a stock Excalibur blend. If it is a custom blend, then it is 100lb for dry seasoning, or 150 gallons for sauces.

    Do I need to provide my own label design or can Excalibur help with the label design?

    Either is possible. If you have an existing design, Excalibur work with you to make it appropriate to fit on their product sizes, or Excalibur can help design the graphics on the whole label.

    What kind of seasoning can be private labeled?

    Any seasoning. Either an existing Excalibur blend can have the name changed and private labeled, or if you have a custom blend Excalibur can match it and re-produce it for you as a private label.

    If I do a custom blend, will Excalibur Seasoning or Walton’s share my recipe with anyone?

    Absolutely not. If you use a custom blend and give Excalibur/Walton’s the formulation, we will not share, distribute, or sell it to anyone else.

    Why would I want to use a private labeled seasoning?

    The local movement right now is very strong and not going away, and if you are a small business and you can put your name on a seasoning instead of selling or offering larger brand name seasonings, you are more likely to have customers come back and keep ordering more from you since it is a local brand they can identify with.

    What size of containers do private label seasoning come in?

    There are 7 options for sizes of containers. An 8oz shaker bottle, Small Institutional, or Large Institutional for dry seasonings, and then 12oz bottle, 2 liter “tip & pour”, 1/2 gallon round, or 1 gallon round for sauces and liquids.

    Where do I start if I want to get my own seasoning private labeled?

    Email Walton’s at cs@waltonsinc.com or call us at 800-835-2832. We will assign a customer service representative or salesmen to your account and help walk you through the process.


    Shop waltonsinc.com for Excalibur Seasoning





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  • P

    I do it all the time. Still remember my mom saying it’s not a good idea. I’m sure if you are buying a nice steak and intend it eat it as a grilled T-bone you might notice some flesh cell break down (texture change). If you are going to use it in sausage you will not notice any difference. Made brats last night. Once frozen pork and elk. Refroze the brats. I do it time and time again.

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  • E

    Here is a link to a website that has a handy Excel spreadsheet. It is, as it says a free non-commercial site.
    As for Waltons dropping the ball, I vote they are doing a great job.
    I think for all of us there are general guidelines, but unless you have a temperature and humidity controlled environment, both for the preparation, cooking (if you cook them) smoking, hanging etc, the results are bound to vary from batch to batch.
    Personally, I am searching how to get my home made smoked and dry cured pepperoni to the exact texture and firmness of Margarita pepperoni from the store.
    Through trial and error I have the flavor where I want it, but not the texture or firmness. I know time, temperature and humidity are all crucial, but the best I can do is in the basement and then subject to the environment that is there.
    I figure as long as I am not killing anyone or making anyone sick I am making progress. Thanks Waltons for all of the great information so far.
    Having said that, it would be nice to have your chart in an Excel spreadsheet.

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  • K

    @jonathon

    Thanks Jonathon! One question tho! You eluded to 178 being high for a temp! Don’t you guys recommend setting the temp at 175 during the final stage to completion to internal temp? Three degrees shouldn’t make that much difference should it??

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  • K

    @lamurscrappy

    Sounds reasonable. Thanks for your input. Pulling the meat at 152 will make a big difference I bet! Thanks again.

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  • @Kinger Thanks for the information. Your process, other than going to 178, is on in my mind. The only thing I do differently is an ice bath for 20 minutes. Showering for 10 minutes, if you are running a cycle and a fan in your smoker can work, but I still think an ice bath would bring it down faster and more. Last time I did thick summer sausage it was down to 110 in 20 minutes, I also tried showering it at 2 minutes on 2 minutes off for 20 minutes and it was only down to 136 (ish) but i did not have a fan running on them.

    One more thing you might want to try, if you are stalled towards the end you can finish them up by putting them in a vacuum bag (I have done then hot, right from the smoker, some condensation in the bag but it still gets a good vac) and get some water going at around 165, it should get up to temp in under an hour depending on the thickness.

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