Canada goose recipes/ideas


  • Regular Contributors

    Just looking for some ideas for using up some goose breasts.


  • Canning

    I once made jerky from it that was very tasty!


  • Team Orange Masterbuilt

    It does make great jerky.


  • Regular Contributors

    Jerky is awesome, I also make dried goose with a bacon rub which is great. Sticks and sausage is also good, but it’s difficult to keep the shot pellets out of your grinder. Maybe someone else has a solution to that problem.


  • Team Blue

    s.a.m I would suggest using the ‘Toulouse’ sausage recipe from Hank Shaw! I’ve only tried making it with chicken or turkey so far but it’s delicious.


  • Regular Contributors

    Joe Hell thanks for the recommendation.
    On another subject in searching for a vertical smoker
    For makinging 50# batches on snack sticks.
    I would also like to have a themostatically controlled system. Thanks Dave


  • Regular Contributors

    This would be for home use, not commercial.


  • Team Blue Big Green Egg Traeger

    s.a.m We always mix with pork fat and make sausage or snack sticks. Or you can marinate and grill per pic. We thoroughly enjoy the grilled method with a horseradish cream sauce 570310989(2).jpg


  • Team Blue

    We always use goose for brats, our last batch we did Italian and our favorite which is cranberry / swiss , great sweet flavor. It also works great for breakfast sausage that we sometimes put in a crockpot with Velveeta and a can of rottelle , make an awesome hot dip. When I run it through my grinder I cut the breasts into about 1/4 inch strips , easy to spot the pellets’ that way, takes a bit longer but I’ve never had a pellet get to my grinder plate


  • Team Blue Big Green Egg Traeger

    What are you using for the cranberry flavoring.


  • Team Blue

    Dried cranberries, I buy them in the bulk section of our local super market


  • Team Blue Dry Cured Sausage Admin Walton's Employee Canning

    s.a.m Snow Goose Pepperoni was amazing as was Cajun sausage with goose and our retail store manager used the Hatch Green Chili Brat and they were pretty amazing. He used 17 lb of a mix of goose and pork fat (20%) to the entire bag of the seasoning so that the salt content would be closer to what you would want in a snack stick.

    Darkfish89 What was your favorite?



  • Jonathon I would have to say the pepperoni is the best flavor for me. Hatch was fantastic and I would be more than happy if that was the only flavor I had but there is just something about the pepperoni with goose that is hard to beat.


  • Team Blue

    Darkfish89 That sounds tasty!



  • Check out Hank Shaw site look for German Smoke Goose breast:
    You need to read the whole thing but here is the basic recipe

    German Smoked Goose Breast
    I made this with domestic goose breast, but there is no reason you can’t do it with skin-on breasts of Canada or whitefront geese. You could also use a big, domestic Moulard duck breast, too. Don’t try it with skinny or small birds. You need the curing salt No. 1 for this recipe; you can buy it online.
    Prep Time
    20 mins
    Cook Time
    4 hrs
    Total Time
    3 hrs 20 mins
    Course: Cured MeatCuisine: GermanServings: 2 breastsAuthor: Hank Shaw
    Ingredients
    Skin-on breasts from 1 large goose, about 2 pounds
    44 grams of kosher salt, about 4 tablespoons
    3 grams of Instacure No. 1, about 1/2 teaspoon
    25 grams sugar, about 2 tablespoons
    4 grams crushed juniper, about 1 tablespoon
    10 grams freshly ground black pepper, about 1 tablespoon
    1/2 cup peaty Scotch whisky (optional)
    Instructions
    If you are using the Scotch, put the goose breasts in a bowl and coat them with the whisky. Put them into a closed container just about large enough to hold them and refrigerate overnight.
    The next day, mix all the remaining ingredients in a bowl. Drain the goose breasts, or just pat them dry if you have not done the Scotch soak. Massage the spice mixture into the meat, making sure every bit of the goose is covered. Put the goose breasts into a closed container that just barely fits the meat. Pour in any excess salt/spice mixture, cover and refrigerate for 3 to 4 days. Every day during the curing process, turn the goose breasts over so they are evenly coated.
    When the meat has cured, it will be dark red and slightly firm to the touch throughout. Rinse it off briefly under cold running water and pat it dry. Let the meat sit out in a cool place for 2 to 4 hours, preferably with some sort of breeze or fan on it. Or you can leave it to dry in the fridge uncovered overnight.
    Truss the meat as you would a roast, or stuff it into sausage netting. If you do the netting, wear an apron, as you will need to manhandle the goose breast into the netting. Take your time and do it little by little. Tie off the ends of the string or netting, leaving enough at the end with the most fat – this should be the thick end of the breast – to hang. You want the fattiest part of the goose breast at the top, so the fat can drip down and keep the meat moist.
    Hang the breasts in an unheated smoker and smoke over beech, alder, oak or cherry wood. Apple is a good substitute, too. Start the smoke cold and gradually bring the temperature up. Your goal is to have the thickest part of the goose breast reach 140°F to 150°F by the end of cooking. Move the goose breasts out of the smoker and allow to return to room temperature before refrigerating.
    The smoked goose will last 10 days in the fridge, or a year if well sealed and frozen.
    Notes
    If you are using the Scotch, put the goose breasts in a bowl and coat them with the whisky. Put them into a closed container just about large enough to hold them and refrigerate overnight. The next day, mix all the remaining ingredients in a bowl. Drain the goose breasts, or just pat them dry if you have not done the Scotch soak. Massage the spice mixture into the meat, making sure every bit of the goose is covered. Put the goose breasts into a closed container that just barely fits the meat. Pour in any excess salt/spice mixture, cover and refrigerate for 3 to 4 days. Every day during the curing process, turn the goose breasts over so they are evenly coated. When the meat has cured, it will be dark red and slightly firm to the touch throughout. Rinse it off briefly under cold running water and pat it dry. Let the meat sit out in a cool place for 2 to 4 hours, preferably with some sort of breeze or fan on it. Or you can leave it to dry in the fridge uncovered overnight. Truss the meat as you would a roast, or stuff it into sausage netting. If you do the netting, wear an apron, as you will need to manhandle the goose breast into the netting. Take your time and do it little by little. Tie off the ends of the string or netting, leaving enough at the end with the most fat – this should be the thick end of the breast – to hang. You want the fattiest part of the goose breast at the top, so the fat can drip down and keep the meat moist. Hang the breasts in a cold smoker and smoke over beech, alder, oak or cherry wood. Apple is a good substitute, too. Start the smoke cold and gradually bring the temperature up. Your goal is to have the thickest part of the goose breast reach 140°F to 150°F by the end of cooking. Move the goose breasts out of the smoker and allow to return to room temperature before refrigerating. The smoked goose will last 10 days in the fridge, or a year if well sealed and frozen.


  • Team Blue

    Grizz Hank Shaw inspires many of my meals!


  • Team Blue Dry Cured Sausage Admin Walton's Employee Canning

    Has anyone ever done anything with Crane? I’ve never had it but the name “Ribeye of the sky” has me very interested.


  • Team Blue

    Grizz This week at the shop I’m going to make ‘duck, duck goose Toulouse’ sausages with Devona Chardonnay using the Hank Shaw recipe


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