• 1 gallon batch

    3 1/2 lbs Clover or your choice honey or blend (will finish sweet)
    1 Large orange (later cut in eights or smaller rind and all)
    1 small handful of raisins (25 if you count but more or less ok)
    1 stick of cinnamon
    1 whole clove ( or 2 if you like - these are potent critters)
    optional (a pinch of nutmeg and allspice )( very small )
    1 teaspoon of Fleishmann’s bread yeast ( now don’t get holy on me— after all this is an ancient mead and that’s all we had back then)
    Balance water to one gallon

    Process:
    Use a clean 1 gallon carboy
    Dissolve honey in some warm water and put in carboy
    Wash orange well to remove any pesticides and slice in eights --add orange (you can push em through opening big boy – rinds included – its ok for this mead – take my word for it – ignore the experts)

    Put in raisins, clove, cinnamon stick, any optional ingredients and fill to 3 inches from the top with cold water. ( need room for some foam – you can top off with more water after the first few day frenzy)

    Shake the heck out of the jug with top on, of course. This is your sophisticated aeration process.

    When at room temperature in your kitchen, put in 1 teaspoon of bread yeast. ( No you don’t have to rehydrate it first-- the ancients didn’t even have that word in their vocabulary-- just put it in and give it a gentle swirl or not)(The yeast can fight for their own territory)

    Install water airlock. Put in dark place. It will start working immediately or in an hour. (Don’t use grandma’s bread yeast she bought years before she passed away in the 90’s)( Wait 3 hours before you panic or call me) After major foaming stops in a few days add some water and then keep your hands off of it. (Don’t shake it! Don’t mess with them yeastees! Let them alone except its okay to open your cabinet to smell every once in a while.


  • How long does it have to sit before drinking?


  • Pokeypaks said in Mead recipe:

    How long does it have to sit before drinking?

    Month or two longer is better.

  • Team Orange Masterbuilt Big Green Egg Dry Cured Sausage Sous Vide Canning Power User

    beekeeper84 yup it is a pretty simple recipe and easy to make. The longer you can leave it after bottling the better. I have about 5 gallons of various years resting and three gallons of wild blackberry melomel waiting to transfer to bottles. Enjoy


  • YooperDog what’s your oldest bottle I have one that is 3years old.


  • YooperDog have you tried wild fermented mead I like doing it but there’s a lot more work to it.

  • Team Orange Masterbuilt Big Green Egg Dry Cured Sausage Sous Vide Canning Power User

    In mead my guess is 10+ years. I have been making mead since we started bee keeping, about 20 year’s ago. My wife got ill and we backed out of bee keeping about a year ago. We still have some bulk bottled up. Looking at making some ginger mead and bragot this fall. First time for each.

  • Team Orange Masterbuilt Big Green Egg Dry Cured Sausage Sous Vide Canning Power User

    beekeeper84 not mead. I have tried it with hard ciders and some wines as an experiment. I have control issues and have a need to control to expected results. LOL


  • YooperDog lol I understand

  • Team Orange

    beekeeper84 - Just found this mead recipe you posted a few months ago, and would really like to try it. I was wondering though if a 1 gallon jug is large enough? I make homebrew, and I use 7 gallon fermenters for a 5 gallon batch of beer, and sometimes the beginning fermentation that first few days gets so violent, it nears the top of the fermenter. Using 5 or 6 gallon vessels, I’ve had some close calls to having foam all over the closet floor, so do you think 3" headspace is enough for a gallon jug? Other question was the yeast. I see Fleischmann’s Active Dry Yeast 0.75 oz. packets available, but have never used them. Do you think one packet would be close to equaling a teaspoon (or should I dump it into a teaspoon and if it looks short, add another? Oh, last question… and can I just top it off with some Reverse Osmosis filtered/treated water from a water jug (or should it be boiled first)? Thanks! John


  • IndianaJohn said in Mead recipe:

    beekeeper84 - Just found this mead recipe you posted a few months ago, and would really like to try it. I was wondering though if a 1 gallon jug is large enough? I make homebrew, and I use 7 gallon fermenters for a 5 gallon batch of beer, and sometimes the beginning fermentation that first few days gets so violent, it nears the top of the fermenter. Using 5 or 6 gallon vessels, I’ve had some close calls to having foam all over the closet floor, so do you think 3" headspace is enough for a gallon jug? Other question was the yeast. I see Fleischmann’s Active Dry Yeast 0.75 oz. packets available, but have never used them. Do you think one packet would be close to equaling a teaspoon (or should I dump it into a teaspoon and if it looks short, add another? Oh, last question… and can I just top it off with some Reverse Osmosis filtered/treated water from a water jug (or should it be boiled first)? Thanks! John

    So as far as headspace goes sometimes 3"s is enough other times no lol you can always go lower and top off latter there is no harm in doing so. On the yeast there is no harm in putting more in but there is if you put too little because it won’t have a fighting chance to ferment my experience with it is add a little extra if it doesn’t look like enough it won’t hurt the taste or time or change anything also the type of yeast isn’t supper important either if you want you can use other “actual” wine making yeasts bread yeast is just more readily available. As far as water goes any water is fine I prefer just to use tap but I do know that it depends on where you live weather it tastes ok or not. No need to boil the water or honey either there are people that say you need to boil it to kill off any “wild” strains of yeast in the honey but I have found that to be not true in fact I prefer to capture wild yeast strains and use those as opposed to buying them.

  • Team Orange Masterbuilt Big Green Egg Dry Cured Sausage Sous Vide Canning Power User

    IndianaJohn i concur with beekeeper84. The yeast will die off or go dormant when the food source is exhausted or alcohol level they can no longer survive in is reached. If I had city water I would boil or at least let it sit overnight to get rid of any chlorine or anything else they put in it. If space is limited topping off would be the way to go.

  • Team Orange

    Another question… is it OK to leave the orange (rind and all) and the raisins in the jug for a couple of months or even longer, while the mead ferments and ages in a dark place? I’m guessing it shouldn’t be a problem, and eventually I would siphon the mead off of the yeast cake, orange pieces, and raisins, into a clean jug for long term storage, correct?

  • Team Orange

    I guess I should bottle for longer term storage, rather than move it to a secondary, or maybe move it to a clean secondary for bottling soon afterward.

  • Team Orange Masterbuilt Big Green Egg Dry Cured Sausage Sous Vide Canning Power User

    IndianaJohn personally I would not leave it longer than necessary. Shortly after the primary ferment is done I would transfer/rack off the old yeast and any fruits etc… At that point you can readjust flavors and such.

  • Team Orange PK100 Sous Vide Power User

    IndianaJohn Get some wine yeast. Since you’re already homebrewing, I bet your supply store carries some wine yeasts. Wine yeast is much less expensive than beer yeast (usually around $1/pack), so you aren’t really adding to your cost. It’s also dry yeast, so it’s easy to deal with. The store probably has some decent insight into choosing a yeast (a bunch of them can work). The quality of your final product will be a good deal better.

    FYI, a packet of baking yeast contains 2.25 teaspoons.

  • Team Blue

    TexLaw yup…a high gravity yeast should work. I keep trying to make and/or appreciate mead. I can ferment with the best of them but mead seems to elude me. Perhaps it’s the style itself. Someone just offered a large amount of local honey the other day for a great price so I might try again this spring.

  • Regular Contributors

    In my experience, using the correct yeast has a huge effect on the quality/flavor of the finished product. Don’t shortcut on the yeast. Wine or champagne yeast is the right kind to use for mead. It is more alcohol tolerant and will ferment out to a higher abv.


  • IndianaJohn said in Mead recipe:

    Another question… is it OK to leave the orange (rind and all) and the raisins in the jug for a couple of months or even longer, while the mead ferments and ages in a dark place? I’m guessing it shouldn’t be a problem, and eventually I would siphon the mead off of the yeast cake, orange pieces, and raisins, into a clean jug for long term storage, correct?

    The only issue with leaving fruit especially orange in it for too long it will begin to leave a bitter taste so I always pull the fruit after primary. Yes long term can be done in any size vessel and that’s pretty much how I do it.


  • With mead based wines in mind if you want to be technical about it champagne yeasts really are not the best and most wine type yeast will detract from the actual flavor. Yes there are specific strains for mead and I have used them they work well. Capturing a wild strain is really the best way to make a mead as that is going to produce a low-medium abv with alot of flavor. Just kinda depends on what you want in the end for taste.

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