Which sharpener should you be using in your Kitchen?


  • Walton's Employee

    Meatgistics: Which sharpener should you be using in your Kitchen?

    Learn about some differences in knife sharpeners and which one you should be using in your kitchen. Learn about the Hexarmor NXT cut resistant glove, save 15% on your next order with coupon code MEATGISTICS18. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    Meat Hacks

    Watch the video to see our latest Meat Hack or read more about it here:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWpOa4btywQ

    Product Spotlight

    For our product review we have the Hexarmor NXT cut resistant glove. A lot of cut resistant gloves are bulky and make it awkward to handle a knife for long periods. The Hexarmor is nice and thin so I can retain full range of motion and dexterity. It has additional coating that exceeds ISEA level 5 cut protection on the palm and first three fingers which is where the majority of accidents happen. We just sharpened a knife and I can press down and saw pretty hard and it is nowhere near to breaking through the glove. It also has the added benefit of being poke resistant on the first three fingers, where it has the extra coating. I can stab at my hand with some pretty serious force and my hand is protected. So, do yourself a favor and add a Hexarmor NXT glove to your next order from Walton’s, they are only $15.99 and they can prevent a trip to the emergency room!

    Coupons & Savings

    Just for our Meatgistics audience and YouTube subscribers, and because we know you guys like coupons and discounts, we’ve got a coupon just for you to save a bit extra! For 3 weeks after this video is published, use the coupon code MEATGISTICS41 in your shopping cart at waltonsinc.com to save 15% off any order. (up to $100 discount and not valid on sale items)

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  • C

    @weatherbow21 I agree with Jonathon of several points. I have been making snack sticks and summer sausage for years and I have scrapped my fair share of batches. There is certainly a difference between wild game and beef or pork from the store. My advice on this, buy a 10lb “log” of 80/20 from Sam’s. This takes out the grinding and having to mix in the right amount of fat. I have made several successful batches this way. BE PATIENT! The more meat you have in the smoker, the longer it is going to take, however, you will find that your temps will fluctuate less. If you get impatient and crank up the heat, you increase your chances of “fatting out”. Been there, done that.
    You don’t have to put the entire batch in the smoker at one time as long as you are not using citric acid. Put in a few pounds, follow the temp settings in the recipe, and you will likely have good results in 4-5 hours max. I never set my smokers above 170, but I may try since I am seeing 175 a lot in the Walton’s recipes.
    For a binder, I always use soy protein, but the type of binder that you use is based on your preference. I never make a batch without it.
    I also document everything from start to finish. I find this helps me to remember not to leave ingredients out of my recipe. It sucks when you get done stuffing and then find your bag of cheese still sitting on the counter. ☹ I document my temp settings, time of day, internal temp, smoke on, smoke off, etc. and I do this with every batch I make. You can then record your results, flavor, texture, presentation. I often go back through my notes just skimming results to see what worked and what didn’t, especially if I am trying a new recipe. If you are fairly new to sausage making and you are not busting casings during the stuffing process, you might not be packing them tight enough. You definitely do not want to under stuff. You will get unsightly fat deposits between the meat and the casing. Don’t give up!

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  • B

    I used the carrot fiber at rate suggested and my homemade 60/40 pork/venison sausage came out dry…was really disappointing…any idea what happened?

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  • C

    I want to smoke some turkey necks this weekend to use as seasoning meat. I want to smoke them at around 165-170° (smoker temp) so I can get maximum smoke before they are cooked internally. I know with sausage you have to cure at these temps. What about turkey necks? Are they safe to smoke without any sort of cure with the pit temp being around 160-170°?

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