Kielbasa too salty to eat


  • I recently made a 25 lb batch of kielbasa. I used the kielbasa spice package that was for 25 lbs. Followed the recipe to the letter, but the sausage is way too salty to eat.

    Any ideas what could have went wrong? I have another spice package for 25lb of Polish, but I dont want to ruin any more meat.

    Please help!

  • Team Blue

    Common problem using table salt not course sea salt. Table salt can be twice as much as sea salt by weight or cup. Also it’s a good idea to taste test before stuffing. Could have added sugar to compensate for too much salt (within reason) Just my opine.😎

  • Team Blue Regular Contributors Green Mountain Grill Masterbuilt

    I’ve made the Kielbasa before and it is absolutely one of my favorite seasonings I’ve used. I didn’t find it overly salty but that can be a subjective thing. Not sure what could’ve happened but as was mentioned you can always take a little bit and fry it up prior to stuffing to make sure everything is good to go. Personally when I am using a seasoning for the first time I make a small test batch to make sure I like or if I need to make any adjustments. This is not a necessary step but I usually am making products from venison so I’m a little more cautious since I can’t just run to the grocery store and buy more if I don’t like the final product.

  • Team Blue

    Adam, do these packets include salt… Not familiar with them. Most I’ve seen salt and cure are added. Good advice 😎

  • Regular Contributors

    bikercowboy said in Kielbasa too salty to eat:

    I recently made a 25 lb batch of kielbasa. I used the kielbasa spice package that was for 25 lbs. Followed the recipe to the letter, but the sausage is way too salty to eat.

    Any ideas what could have went wrong? I have another spice package for 25lb of Polish, but I dont want to ruin any more meat.

    Please help!

    If you were using a premixed spice pack and did not make any adjustments, then we should be able to assume the salt content was probably correct.

    If the salt content is correct, the only other thing that can go wrong is uneven distribution of the spices into the meat mixture.

    How did you mix the spices into your meat? Hand mixing or mechanical mixing? If you dumped the whole spice pack into the mixing container, its possible you did not get the spices mixed evenly in the meat, which could make some parts saltier/spicier than other parts of the meat mix which would be correspondingly blander.

    If adding dry spices, I like to sprinkle them in slowly while mixing the meat to help get everything dispersed evenly.

    If I mix the spices in water first, I will do it in a blender and make slurry, then add the slurry into the meat slowly while its mixing.

    Another thing that can potentially make sausage or cured meat saltier is if it gets too dry while smoking. Removing the water from the meat essentially concentrates the salt.


  • I didnt add any salt to the mix. went straight by the directions. I also tasted it before stuffing, however, the cure would not have time to activate by then. I will try again with the polish seasoning since this is all I have left. I mix by hand, but was pretty confident I had it mixed well. We will see how the next batch goes.

  • Regular Contributors

    Another advantage to mixing the seasoning pack with some water is the soluble spices like the salt and cure will dissolve and dilute down into the water. Now that the salt and cure is in solution, it becomes easier to get a more even distribution in your meat mix.

  • Team Blue

    It’s my understanding that cure #1 doesn’t activate till smoking / cooking. Protects the meat from bacteria growth during slow or cold smoking. Flash grilling / smoking does not require it, but does enhance the color to pink instead of gray during cooking. Cure#2 is necessary for fermented product only. It enhances good bat growth during the fermentation. I always mix with water first, but add cheese last (frozen). Just my opine😎

  • Regular Contributors

    JoeB said in Kielbasa too salty to eat:

    It’s my understanding that cure #1 doesn’t activate till smoking / cooking. Protects the meat from bacteria growth during slow or cold smoking.

    Curing regularly takes place at low temperatures. It is common to cure meat at refrigerator-temperatures, and this is regularly done to hams, bacon, and sausage.

    One of the benefits of curing meat is that bacterial growth is inhibited when the meat temperature is raised to the “danger zone”, between 40 degrees and 140 degrees, i.e. when smoking.

  • Team Blue

    No contest processhead . I think we are saying the same thing from different perspectives. Curing meat is not synonymous with cure#1. One is a process and the other is an additive that prevents the botulinum toxin. Salt is the big guy here. That being said, I was referencing flash cooking vs cold smoking. To my understanding when bacterial growth is not a problem it’s not necessary, but doesn’t hurt and does help color during cooking. as you know Insta Cure #1 is a specialty formulated mixture of Salt and Sodium Nitrite. Nitrites are necessary to prevent the botulinum toxin (Chlostridium botulinum) from growing in Low & Slow Smoked/Cooked Sausages, Bacon, Hams, and alike. The lower than normal temperatures and longer cooking process in the bacterial is a danger zone especially in smoked foods.😎

  • Power User PK100 Regular Contributors

    JoeB you are referring to ECA and smoked meat stabilizer. The sure cure, pink cure salts works during its 12 hour refrigerator time before smoking. The ECA and smoked meat stabilizer doesnt start to work until a certain temperature during the cooking process

  • Team Blue

    Sorry I don’t use ECA or smoke meat stabilizer. I am referring to the sodium nitrite that uses the pink colored salt as a medium called cure#1 i.e. insta cure. But I know what your saying… Thanks. Nitrate is a whole different animal. It was also mixed in the raw ground meat in butcher shops to turn the meat red for looks. 18-1900’s Now, outlawed for a long time in most countries.😎

  • Sous Vide Canning PK100 Team Blue Power User Regular Contributors

    This is a fresh sausage right? do you even need any cure?

  • Team Blue

    No not necessary, unless you slow or cold smoke. I do use it in my fresh sausage because I don’t know what someone will do with it or how they will cook it after I give it to them. Just a safety thing.

  • Power User

    When using prepackaged pork I take into account the salt that was added to the meat for more water/weight.

  • Team Blue

    Glen, for the most part “prepackaged”, you’re working with an unknown. For me it’s best to use B.O. pork butts or chuck roll. Very few limitations on preprocessed meat. FTA will allow 50% water in cold cuts and processed meat. That’s why cold cuts get slimy after a few days… water is coming out and the additives can’t hold it in 😎

  • Power User

    Right about the unknown, but if the OP used grocery pre-packed pork the salt they put in the package solution may be responsible for the too salty outcome

  • Team Blue

    Good thoughts, Always go back to the basics. The Romans had none of these wonderful additives. Just wild pig and a few spices … And lots, lots of wine. Romans never drank beer because it was considered barbaric since the Celts drank it. Romans drank wine. Their wine was always laced with water as it is not in their culture to drink wine straight. Romans drank calda during the winter. This is wine mixed with warm water and laced with spices. They would catch, butcher wild pigs, use their intestines’ for sausage casings and cook over an open fire. Premixed packs were no place to be found. Amazon delivery was limited by geographic location at that time 😎

  • Team Blue Regular Contributors Green Mountain Grill Masterbuilt

    JoeB Yes there is salt in the seasoning mixture and if its supposed to be a cured product the cure is in a separate packet.

  • Team Blue

    Thanks Adam, I’ve seen the pre-packets before just never used them. Doesn’t that kind of tie your hands to someone else’s taste buds ?🙄

Log in to reply
 

Suggested Topics

  • 28
  • 6
  • 174
  • 13
  • 7

Community Statistics

18
Online

15.0k
Users

3.2k
Topics

34.0k
Posts

About Meatgistics

Meatgistics is brought to you by Walton's (waltonsinc.com). Meatgistics is a community site, knowledgebase, forum, blog, learning center, and a sharing site. You can find help and ask questions about anything related to meat processing, smoking and grilling meats, plus a whole lot more. Join Austin & Jon from Walton's and sign up for our Meatgistics community today.
Change Text Size