How to Inject your Turkey with Soluble Seasoning - Recipe


  • Walton's Employee

    Injected and Smoked Turkey

    How to Inject your Turkey with Soluble Seasoning

    Learn how to make Injected Turkey with Walton's and Meatgistics. Watch the video, read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    What Is Injected Turkey?

    An Injected Turkey is simply a fresh, uncured and unseasoned Turkey that you will marinate with a soluble seasoning by injecting it directly into the meat and muscle of the turkey. Marinating will give you a more flavorful turkey and since you are injecting the seasoning directly into it you do not have to let it wait as long and it will be a juicier bird as well.

    Meat Block

    15 lb Fresh Turkey

    Additives

    Soluble Turkey Seasoning
    Rosemary Basil and Thyme Rub

    Process

    We are going to inject it with Soluble Turkey Pump and then we are going to rub the outside with Excalibur Seasoning’s Rosemary Basil and Thyme Rub. We recommend using one of the soluble seasonings from Excalibur Seasoning because the particle size of the seasoning is small enough to dissolve in water and more uniformly disperse when injected into meats. For the Soluble Turkey Seasoning, the recommended usage is to dissolve 3 lb of the seasoning in 5 gallons of water for a 20% pump. A 20% pump means we are adding 20% of the weight of the meat in the injection. So because this turkey weighs 15 lbs we will need to inject 3 lb (or 48oz) of the marinade. It is always better to have more, rather than not enough, so we are going to use 0.6 lb of seasoning to a gallon of water, which will give us 8.6 lb of injection and inject 3 lb of that into the turkey. Just like with the cured turkey we are going to inject it and then cover it in a 50% strength solution to let it marinate overnight so it picks up all of the flavor it can. To create our cover marinade we are going to use 0.3 lb of seasoning and 1 gallon of water. Also since this seasoning already contains cold phosphate for moisture retention we do not need to add any more.

    To do this properly we will need an injector, a scale (to measure how much of our mixture we have injected) a meat tray or lug and a large container to store the turkey in. We also like to use the Stark liners as they make everything, especially cleanup, a lot easier. All of these items and more can be found at waltonsinc.com.

    Before we start there are a few important things to consider when preparing your injection. The water needs to be potable, so very low microbial levels and it shouldn’t be “hard” water. The best way to do this is to buy distilled water from the grocery store or you can let your water sit out overnight in a cooler to allow any chlorine to gas out or evaporate.

    Injecting

    We recommend doing an 8 point injection, with 4 injection points on each half of the turkey. Start with the turkey lying flat on a counter or cutting board and on its back with the bottom facing you. Your first injection will be in the middle of the breast and angled down towards the top of the turkey (repeat this injection on the other breast). Injection number 2 will be parallel to the counter, through the middle of the breast, towards the top of the turkey (repeat on both sides of the turkey breast). The third and fourth injection points will be into the drumstick and leg and then inject into the thigh muscle (again repeat to inject both halves of the turkey). That gives us 4 injection points on each side of the turkey, for 8 total injection points. Since this Turkey was 15 lbs we want it to weigh at least 18 lb after injecting, thus hitting our 20% pump goal.

    Now we are going to let this sit in a fridge overnight to let the injection disperse as evenly as possible and to get the most flavorful turkey possible however if you don’t have the time to hold it overnight you can go right to the oven or smoker at this point.

    Rubbing Turkey

    Now that our Turkey has been injected and marinated we are going to add some extra flavor by rubbing it with Rosemary Basil and Thyme Rub all over the outside. This should give it a nice fresh herb taste to go along with the injected seasoning.

    Note

    Most Turkeys still come with a pop-up timer, our best advice is to ignore this thing completely, it has ruined more Thanksgiving dinners than drunken relatives. You want to use an actual digital thermometer to check the temperature of the Turkey.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking

    Stage 1 - 120° F for 30 minutes
    Stage 2 - 135° F for 2.5 hours
    Stage 3 - 160° F for 30 minutes
    Stage 3 - 190° F until internal meat temp of 165°

    Wrap up

    Injecting and then smoking your Turkey at home is a simple and easy way to make sure you have a great tasting and looking turkey! The only thing you really need to do this is an injector, though the marinating buckets, Stark Marinating Liners, and a smoker make it easier and give you a better-finished product.

    Additional Tips

    • If you want to rub the seasoning both above and below the skin that can give you a better taste. To do so you carefully separate the skin from the muscle by slowly working your hands (starting from the cavity side) between the skin and the breast meat.
    • Allowing the turkey to marinate in a 50% strength solution over night will make sure your seasoning evenly distributes inside the muscle

    Watch WaltonsTV: How to Inject your Turkey with Soluble Seasoning

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Soluble Seasonings

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Injectors



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Recent Posts

  • @davhi8
    I wish we could help out more on this one, but this is using someone else’s recipe and process in a way I don’t feel comfortable with (since they recommend not using a cure or nitrite/nitrate). There really isn’t an answer I’d feel safe giving you since this is not something we’ve done and tested like this before.

    My suggestion on hams is always to follow our standard recipe here:
    https://meatgistics.waltonsinc.com/topic/203/how-to-make-homemade-smoked-ham-recipe

    My best alternative suggestion is to look for more information from a state University Meat Extension Department. They have usually done the proper research and development to provide better guidance. The University of Missouri has an article here that might be of help: https://extension2.missouri.edu/g2526

    For the future, I’ll see if we can develop a recipe and process here to provide better guidance towards processing hams in this manner.

    read more
  • B

    Hey folks,

    New to the forum and excited to learn! Looking to smoke my first batch of summers on my smoker. I noticed they have strings for hanging, but my smoker is set up more like a traditional barrel grill.

    Questions: If I lay my summers on the grate of the smoker, will the casings burst/burn?

    Thanks in advance!

    read more
  • D

    The article does not cover when to cold smoke a cured ham. I have 16 wild hog hams in brine as of last night. I need to know at what point do I put them in the smoke house for this phase of the process.

    read more
  • @woodduck
    A cure should be used. We’ve updated the recipe above to reflect that.
    @Jonathon was probably just sleeping when he posted this one… haha!

    For this version of Landjaeger, we did actually cook it. It could be made differently, but for our entry level MeatgisticsU course, it’s easier and safer to give instructions on doing a proper thermal processing. (Someday we will have to try to get to doing a completely traditional dry cured version.)

    Smoked Meat Stabilizer and Sodium Erythorbate are similar to each other, but definitely not a replacement for a real cure, like Sure Cure. They simply act as cure accelerators, speeding up the conversion of nitrite in sausage during thermal processing. Using an accelerator (like one of these, or Encapsulated Citric Acid) allows you to skip the holding stage after stuffing and go straight into the smokehouse.

    read more
  • W

    In the ‘Meat Block’ you don’t list using a cure. The packet of Landjaeger seasoning I purchased came with a packet of Cure.

    As this is a sausage that is ment to be consumed without cooking shouldn’t a cure be used. I know you put in the wrap up about using Smoked Meat Stabilizer or Sodium Erythorbate are they equivalent to using a true cure.

    read more
  • @tswohl6
    You shouldn’t have a noticeable difference in stuffing based upon the difference of using a grinder or a bowl chopper.
    Your biggest help in making stuffing easier will be using plenty of water. At least 1 quart per 25 lb meat block, but up to 2 quarts is even better. And, your lean to fat ratio will make a difference. Leaner meat will be harder to stuff while a higher fat content will make things easier. Keep the meat as cold as possible too and that will help make things a little easier to stuff as well.

    read more

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