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  • Regular Contributors

    Parksider here…
    Rochester NY transplant from PA farm country. Been butchering and processing animals for years. I don’t like hunting, too cold… but I like the processing part so I found some friends that bring the venison, I bring the knowledge and tools: 3/4 hp grinder, 15# vertical stuffer, small vertical smoker, and a custom built 4x4x2 propane assisted smoker to process massive amounts of snack sticks-old PA dutch family recipe, Italian sausage, hot dogs.
    I use lots of natural and collagen casings, like the bulk pack of small slim jim collagens are perfect. Typically run 100# batches of slim jims- cheese, no cheese, mild, hot… you name it we make it but always used base family recipe, worked for the first 100 years, good enough for me…
    Do some BBQ, ribs and butts mostly. Getting into sous vide now to add a new angle.


  • Admin

    @Parksider The processing part is definitely just as fun as the hunting is!
    Welcome to the community!


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Recent Posts

  • M

    I’ll be mixing 25 lbs of venison/pork fat at about a 75/25 ratio tomorrow.
    I’ll mix 12.5 lbs. at a time in my 20 lb mixer. I have pre-measured the seasonings and cure into one bag for each 12.5 lbs. I also have the carrot fiber binder measured for each 12.5 lbs of meat.
    Question 1: Would it work to mix the seasoning, cure, and carrot binder with the ice cold water, then pour into mixer for more even dispersion of ingredients?

    Question 2: On the subject of even dispersion of ingredients…how can only 60 seconds or less of mixing get the encapsulated citric acid evenly dispersed?

    Thanks!

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  • @kking It wouldn’t necessarily hurt anything, the only real danger you would run into is getting some case hardening. That is where the outside cooks too quickly and will not pass heat into the center. So you get an overcooked outside and an undercooked inside. If you stick to your previous smoke schedule and get good protein extraction when mixing (should be sticky and stretch if you grab a handful) then you should be good!

    If you get protein extraction my recommendation is low and slow!

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  • K

    @jonathon will it hurt anything to cook them at a higher temp to get them done quicker or should I stay low and slow?

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  • H

    @jonathon Sounds great. Thank you!

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  • @kking Gotcha! Okay, that changes things a little, if you added sure cure then the only other difference is the grinding and mixing. All of that is contained in the article I posted in my previous one, so if you ground and mixed as I did in that video that . I’m glad people are starting to try adding cure to traditionally fresh products, it’s a great way to experience new flavors!

    Since there was nothing bad growing in your meat (since you used sure cure) then I think the most likely thing would be either be some fat rendering out and essentially basting the casing in fat(which would have happened if you did not get enough protein extraction), or it might just have been a less than perfect batch of casings. They are natural casings and even though they are processed there is going to be some variability. You certainly can use natural hog casings to smoke sausage, people do it often, I just prefer collagen because I find it so much easier to work with and I like the snap of it better.

    The major downside to collagen is that it will not accept a twist as natural casings will.

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  • K

    @jonathon thanks for the help. However I did add sure cure to it when I mixed it and stuffed it. Is the issue I’m using the wrong casing? Do the natural casing not hold up to that slow cooking process. I guess I called them brats because I used brat seasoning.

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