How to Make Homemade Salami


  • Walton's Employee

    Sliced Salami
    Salami Seasoning

    How to Make Salami

    Learn how to make Homemade Salami with Walton's and Meatgistics. Read the guide, and then post your questions or comments below.

    What Is Salami?

    Salami is a type of cured sausage that can be made from pork, beef a combination of the two and can also be made from wild game. It can fermented and dry cured or cooked and smoked. We are going to use 100% beef so we are going to use our regular Salami Unit, if we were making this out of deer or wild game then the Cotto Salami might be a better choice. We are also going to be using Encapsulated Citric acid to give the meat that nice tang and carrot fiber to help with the bind. If you are making this out of Wild Game I would suggest you also use cold phosphate to increase the water holding capacity of the meat.

    Meat Block

    25 lb of Eye of the Round

    Additives

    1 Package (1.4375 lb) of Salami Seasoning
    1 oz of Sure Cure (Included with salami seasoning purchase)
    Fibrous Salami Casings
    2 Quarts of Ice Cold Water

    Optional Additives:
    Carrot Fiber
    Encapsulated Citric Acid
    Cold Phosphate

    Process

    Since this is salami we want to see particle definition in our finished product. That means we want to get our meat cold and keep it cold through the mixing process, once the meat heats up the fat will start to smear and we will lose our chance at a nice looking finished product. This step would be even more important if we were doing a fermented product to allow everything to dry properly but I still want a nice looking product so I put my meat and my head assembly to my grinder in the freezer to get everything cold. I am also going to separate my fat from my lean and grind them separately, I’m just going to cut off the fat cap and then put that back in the freezer until it is time to grind it.

    Before I start grinding I am going to soak my Fibrous Salami Casings in warm water to make them nice and pliable to make stuffing easier, they need to soak for about 30 minutes in warm water.

    I will grind my lean twice, once through a 3/8" plate and then through a 1/8 plate with our Weston #12 Butcher Series Grinder. Always remember to oil your plates and knives to keep friction and heat down. The fat I am just going to grind once through a 3/8 plate. I ground my fat last so I can go right from the grinding to the mixing without the fat warming up. If I wasn’t able to do this quickly I would put my fat back in the freezer.

    Meat Mixing

    Now we need to mix the seasoning, cure, carrot fiber and water with our lean meat and mix until we have protein extraction. As soon as the meat starts to get sticky I am going to add my fat and then mix that in for a minute. Then I’ll mix in my Encapsulated Citric Acid and mix it for another 60 seconds.

    Sausage Stuffing

    Next just stuff them into fibrous salami casings until they are full and smooth. Make sure you leave enough room at the end of each casing to clip them with a Hog Ring. The easiest way to do this at home is to use the Weston Auto Load Hog Ring Pliers

    Note

    With Salami we will want a longer link than we would with Bratwurst, something around 12-18" each. Either hang your casings on smoke sticks or lay on racks in your smokehouse or oven. Just be sure to leave a slight gap between the each salami.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking

    Stage 1 - 125° F for 1 hour
    Stage 2 - 140° F for 1 hour
    Stage 3 - 155° F for 2 hours
    Stage 4 - 175° F until internal meat temp of 160° F

    Cooling

    To help set the casing to the meat and also prevent wrinkling we need to shower the Salami or put them in an ice water bath. It should only take around 10 to 15 minutes to get the temperature to drop down. Then, we’ll let them set out for about 1 hour at room temperature before moving to the refrigerator/freezer. After we are totally done with the cooling process, then we will package in vacuum pouches for longer term storage.

    Wrap up

    Making this type of salami is a simple process, anyone who has made summer sausage before can easily do this, it is very similar and if you don’t care about particle definition it is even simpler.

    Additional Tips

    • If I was doing this again I would have ground my fat through a 3/16 inch plate instead of 3/8 inch plate to make the fat particles a little smaller. Not because I disliked the size of the fat particles but because some of the fat rendered out of the meat during the cooking process.
    • The particle definition only affects the appearance though so if you do not care about that, feel free to mix and grind all meat together.
    • You can use collagen casings if you want but it will be a non-edible version which means you will have to soak it for 15 minutes in water that is 15°C and it has to be a 15% salt solution.

    Watch WaltonsTV: How to Make Salami

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Salami Seasoning

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Sausage Stuffers

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Mixers

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Home Grinders


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