Making links in collagen casing



  • Hi –
    I’m new to sausage making and recently we made our first attempt at making sausage. We are using collagen casings. Filling the casings was a straightforward process but I think we overfilled them as they burst almost immediately on cooking. Second problem was the links we made simply unwound themselves after we cut them - and even unwound themselves if we cooked them without cutting at the links. So, can I get any advice on how to judge the correct amount of filling before making links and is there anything I can do to make the links actually be links, rather than just cylinders filled with sausage meat?
    Thanks –
    Mike


  • Power User

    Couple things, collagen is know for not staying linked. You can twist two links together to help they stay. What are you making? As far as overstuffing, it’s a feel thing- what stuffer are you using? Whether it’s off of a stuffer or off of a grinder you just need time to do a better job throttling the speed that the casing comes off with your thumb it comes with experience. Waltons has a number of videos online to help get a better handle on the stuffing is well I’d recommend watching it on with them.


  • Walton's Employee

    @hbrednek Park Sider (as usual!) pretty much accurately broke it down for you. I love Collagen because it is easier to use than Hog or Sheep casings, no prep is needed and I also like the snap from a fresh collagen more than i like the snap from a hog casing. What I don’t like is exactly what your issue was with linking, they just don’t stay as tightly wrapped, one thing you can do that will help is after you link them and before you cut them put them in a freezer for about an hour. They will still have a tendency to come undone but they will hold a little better.

    As for overstuffing it is a “feel” thing. You are most likely using too much pressure when holding the casing on the tube. A slightly understuffed casing is preferable in my opinion as you can simply twist it a few extra times and it will firm up where as an overstuffed casing will pop when you go to twist it.


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