LiveStreaming & Meatgistics University!


  • Walton's Employee

    Weekly Blog Post - LiveStreaming & Meatgistics University!

    Find out what's going on at Walton's and Meatgistics this week. We will have a loose schedule for soon to be released videos, what we are working on long-term and maybe a few quick tips and tricks that are on our mind!

    What Videos are being released soon?

    Austin and I are going to be doing a little mid-month giveaway on a Livestream! We are aiming for Monday, October 22nd right now, this Livestream will include a giveaway, some steep discount codes for a few lucky customers, some free merchandise for everyone and a coupon code for everyone who watches! We will also be using this video to introduce Meatgistics University and to answer any of your questions and talk about a few recent customer questions on the community section of Meatgistics.

    What Projects are we looking ahead at?

    The introductory classes for Meatgistics University are all shot and being edited now, so we are going to start in on the more advanced videos. These videos will focus more on the science behind meat processing as well as some advanced techniques and tips for making the best homemade products!

    What’s on our Mind?

    Has anyone tried retired dairy cow? I saw something a few weeks ago that said that retired dairy cows had a similar flavor and even texture to Wagyu beef. They had to be cooked a little differently and it was dependant on the Dairy Cows being grass-fed only for the last 6 months but this is incredibly interesting to me! I am going to try to source some retired dairy cow meat and compare it to some Wagyu.

    New Products

    Tubed Hog Casings 35-38mm and Tubed Hog Casings 38-42mm will be back in stock shortly! This is great for anyone wanting to make larger diameter sausages out of natural casings. Tubed Casings can be a big time saver as they are easier to clean and load onto your stuffer.


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  • C
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  • C

    Kansas Dad,
    Thank you, I really appreciate it. That is what I pretty well figured I would do & just put everything in one of those Aluminum BBQ pans I keep then into the coolers lined with Blue Ice at the bottom. The transport is only 4-5 hours, so I think it should be OK, so long as I cool it all down over night first. The ham I ended up with is 25 pounds so I will do one pan for the turkey, another for the ham (that may end up shredded), & others for smoked oyster stuffing, cream corn, sweet potatoes, smoked mashed potatoes, etc. Thank you for all your help, I really appreciate it.

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  • @davhi8
    I wish we could help out more on this one, but this is using someone else’s recipe and process in a way I don’t feel comfortable with (since they recommend not using a cure or nitrite/nitrate). There really isn’t an answer I’d feel safe giving you since this is not something we’ve done and tested like this before.

    My suggestion on hams is always to follow our standard recipe here:
    https://meatgistics.waltonsinc.com/topic/203/how-to-make-homemade-smoked-ham-recipe

    My best alternative suggestion is to look for more information from a state University Meat Extension Department. They have usually done the proper research and development to provide better guidance. The University of Missouri has an article here that might be of help: https://extension2.missouri.edu/g2526

    For the future, I’ll see if we can develop a recipe and process here to provide better guidance towards processing hams in this manner.

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  • B

    Hey folks,

    New to the forum and excited to learn! Looking to smoke my first batch of summers on my smoker. I noticed they have strings for hanging, but my smoker is set up more like a traditional barrel grill.

    Questions: If I lay my summers on the grate of the smoker, will the casings burst/burn?

    Thanks in advance!

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  • D

    The article does not cover when to cold smoke a cured ham. I have 16 wild hog hams in brine as of last night. I need to know at what point do I put them in the smoke house for this phase of the process.

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  • @woodduck
    A cure should be used. We’ve updated the recipe above to reflect that.
    @Jonathon was probably just sleeping when he posted this one… haha!

    For this version of Landjaeger, we did actually cook it. It could be made differently, but for our entry level MeatgisticsU course, it’s easier and safer to give instructions on doing a proper thermal processing. (Someday we will have to try to get to doing a completely traditional dry cured version.)

    Smoked Meat Stabilizer and Sodium Erythorbate are similar to each other, but definitely not a replacement for a real cure, like Sure Cure. They simply act as cure accelerators, speeding up the conversion of nitrite in sausage during thermal processing. Using an accelerator (like one of these, or Encapsulated Citric Acid) allows you to skip the holding stage after stuffing and go straight into the smokehouse.

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