Jerky 101 - What is Jerky?


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    Jerky

    Jerky 101 - What Is Jerky?

    Attend this entry level class from Meatgistics University by watching the video, reading the article and post any questions you have!

    What is Jerky?

    Jerky is a meat product that has been processed, seasoned, cured and then cooked or dried. Drying and curing meat is one of the oldest ways to preserve meat and has been around for 1,000s of years. It is typically made from low-fat content pieces of meat or has had the fat trimmed off. Jerky should still be cooked up to 160°F internal temperature to kill off harmful bacteria.

    Types of Jerky

    Whole Muscle - Whole muscle is jerky that has been sliced into strips between 1/8" and 1/4" inch then coated on all sides with a mixture of the seasoning and the cure. Once that is done it will be placed in a plastic bag with just enough water to cover all the strips and held in a refrigerator for 12 hours and then cooked and or dehydrated. The advantages of this type of jerky are that it is easy to do and you need minimal equipment.

    Restructured Jerky - This is a form of jerky that has been ground up, seasoned and cured and then extruded into strips or sticks. The jerky is then cooked and or dehydrated to form the classic jerky structure. The advantage of this type of jerky is that you can control what form the jerky takes and that you can use more of the animal as you don’t need to start with a whole muscle cut of meat.

    Water activity

    A key part of making jerky is lowering the water activity. A simple explanation of water activity is that it represents the amount of water in a product that is free to be used for microbial growth. A product can have some moisture to it but most of that water is bound up with the meat, or sugar and mold or other microbes cannot access it to begin spoiling the meat.

    Cure

    You might hear some people say that Jerky does not need to be cured as it is going to be dried out. However, the meat will not start out at that level of dryness and since we are cooking this at low temperatures we are creating an environment that is ideal for the growth of botulism, so cure should be used for safety reasons. Think of it as a seat belt, your car will start without it but it’s not a great idea to ride around town without it on!

    Smoking/Dehydrating

    We do not recommend that you use only a dehydrator unless that dehydrator can run at 160 or above. The reason for this is if you dehydrate the meat before killing off the bacteria you have made that bacteria much harder to kill. In essence, you need some moisture to kill the bad bacteria.

    Storage

    If you have a way to measure water activity and it is below .85 then you do not really need to vacuum package it and it can be left out, now, there are other factors here but it is a good general rule. However, since most people do not have a way to monitor this you should still either put it in an airtight container and store it in the fridge or vacuum package it.

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  • R

    Any idea of brand on the “brown” ones? I used to be able to buy them from my local butcher but he has since stopped selling them. Or where to purchase?

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  • E

    @ramt600 I had the same thing happen with the reddish ones also and the brown ones worked the best so, I just stopped using the red casings.

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  • Another way is with a digital gram scale. 1 ounce = 28 grams. 6 oz = 168 grams. 168 ÷ 100 = 1.68 grams per pound.

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  • @meatmadam
    You will need to inject the hams first. After injecting, then take any leftover brine, and put that with the hams into a tumbler. Then, tumble for 2-3 hours. Hold it overnight in a cooler, and then smoke it the next day!

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  • M

    Thank you Austin, looking forward to try it with my new vacuum tumbler! As the tumbler does not allow for 24 hours of tumble ( dial cannot be set longer than one hour )what is recommended for doing a ham?

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  • @meatmadam
    If the usage is 6 oz per 100 lb of meat, to recalculate for another batch size, simply divide the additive weight by the meat block weight (6/100) and that equals how much to use per lb of meat (which is 0.06 oz per lb). You can then take the 0.06 oz and multiple that by however many pounds of meat you are making, so if that is 5 lb, then you end up needing 0.3 oz per 5 lb of meat.

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