Sausage Casings 101 - Sausage Casings Basics

  • Team Blue Admin Walton's Employee Power User

    Sausage Casing

    Sausage Casings 101 - Sausage Casings Basics

    Attend this entry level class from Meatgistics University by watching the video, reading the article and post any questions you have!

    Sausage Casings

    Why Use A Sausage Casing?

    Any casing, whether it is a natural, collagen or fibrous is going to offer some uniformity to the diameter of your product. This is important because it will allow the product to cook evenly. If you had a product that was half-again as thick in some areas than others then the thinner parts would be overcooked before the thicker parts were safe to eat. In commercial processing, uniformity is even more important for appearance and to be able to consistently track the amount of sausage being produced.

    Appearance

    Casings also give sausage a certain look, it is generally easy to determine what casing was used to make a sausage vs when it has been extruded. Natural casings will often have a curve in them that can be anywhere from slight to fairly extreme while collagen casings will be more uniform and straight.

    Mouth Feel

    Mouth Feel is a term that refers to the sensations associated with eating certain types of foods. For casings, this will be determined by a few factors, some of which will depend on cook cycle but to keep things simple Collagen will have less of a snap than natural casings will. In surveys, it was found that the reduced snap of collagen was generally preferred to natural casings. Different types or variants of collagen casings will also have a different mouthfeel as they have different levels of toughness.

    Inedible Casings

    Some types of sausage casings, such as cellulose, are inedible and are made to be peeled off after thermal processing but before consumption. These cellulose casings have a stripe down the middle to let you easily identify if the casing has been peeled or not yet. However, these ring bologna casings are also an inedible collagen but that do not have any markings on them so you have to be careful when using these. Trying to consume inedible collagen isn’t going to be harmful but it will give you a very tough and chewy bite.

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Collagen Casings

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Fibrous Casings

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Natural Casings


  • How can you keep your collagen casings from splitting while on the grill? I made brats last week with collagen casings and they are practically exploding on the grill.

  • Team Blue

    RWalker24 Poke several holes and go low and slow!


  • Joe Hell I will try that. Thank you

  • Team Blue Admin Walton's Employee Power User

    RWalker24 Another thing that might be happening is overstuffing them? Joe Hell is correct though, poking a few holes to allow pressure to bleed out will absolutely help prevent the burst casings.

  • Team Blue

    One method I have been using lately, in addition to poking holes, is to fire up my smoker at 225 and cooking them (with or without smoke) until they hit an internal temp of around 150-155 (about an hour) and then finishing them on the grill to add some color until they reach 165.


  • How are brats that are stuff in collagen casings? I have never used anything but hog casings. Can you tell a big difference when you are eating them?

  • Team Blue Power User Traeger Primo Grills PK Grills Canning Sous Vide Community Moderator

    mrwoody there is a little bit of difference in the bite. Natural will have somewhat of a snap to them, where as collagen is more of a cleaner bite with less snap. Collagen casings also won’t hold a twist.


  • mrwoody thanks for the info

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