Meat Processing Equipment 102 - Sausage Stuffers


  • Walton's Employee

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    Meat Processing Equipment 102 Sausage Stuffers

    Attend this entry level class from Meatgistics University by watching the video, reading the article and post any questions you have!

    What Are The Main Functions?

    Sausage stuffers are the best way to take a ground product and get into a casing or meat bag. They can be vertical or horizontal, hand crank, electric, hydraulic or vacuum powered. The Walton’s Sausage Stuffers are vertically orientated and come in 7, 11, 26 and 33 lb models.

    Hydraulic Stuffer
    Stuffer at an Angle
    Stuffing

    How Do They Work?

    These stuffers have two gears, one on the bottom that is designed for stuffing and one above that can only be used to quickly reverse your piston out of the cannister. The canister is secured to the frame by 4 brackets, 2 on each side. The bottom bracket supports the canister during stuffing from vertical pressure where the top bracket locks it in. Your ground and seasoned meat is loaded into the canister by tilting the canister backward, once it has been filled it needs to be locked back in place. Attach the hand crank to the lower of the two gears on the side and begin cranking. As you crank the gears will turn in the gearbox, forcing the rack down and pushing the piston down through the canister. This will force your meat down and out the stuffing tube at the bottom and into your casing or meat bag.

    How Important is it?

    A Stuffer is an important piece of equipment for any home processor. Stuffers make it easy to get near perfectly filled casings nearly everytime. They also allow you to use much smaller casings than you would be able to if you were trying to stuff off of a grinder.

    Alternatives

    Most Meat Grinders have some stuffing capability and they certainly can be used for stuffing sausage. However, it will be much slower than if you used an actual sausage stuffer and you generally cannot stuff small diameter products like snack sticks off of a Meat Grinder.

    Should You Buy One

    If someone is looking to make their own homemade fresh sausage a sausage stuffer might be the first thing I would recommend. You can purchase already ground meat, mix in the seasoning and stuff them into casings and you are done. If you are making cured products you will probably need a few other pieces of equipment but a stuffer is, in my mind, still a very important piece of equipment. If deciding between a Stuffer and a Meat Grinder for you,r first purchase it will come down to the question of how you are obtaining your meat. For a hunter, I would absolutely recommend you buy a grinder first but to make a really quality product you are going to eventually want a sausage stuffer.

    Best Choice For Beginners

    7 lb or the 11 lb Sausage Stuffer are my two favorite models for small batches, which is what you will probably do at the beginning. The reason for this is that the piston on both of these models have a smaller diameter, which means that it requires less force to crank down the handle.

    Other Information

    The size of your stuffing tube and casing will play a large part in how much effort it takes to turn your crank. The larger the tube the easier it will crank as there will be less resistance, the fat content, water content and other factors of your product can also play a large part as well.

    Walton’s Sausage Stuffers are made from stainless steel and zinc coated aluminum. They come with 4 different sized stainless steel stuffing tubes, a 12mm, 16mm, 22mm, 38mm, and a 10mm is also available for purchase for stuffing very small snack sticks. Just remember that the smaller the tube the more force that will be required to crank the handle.

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Sausage Stuffers

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Snack Stick Seasonings

    Shop waltonsinc.com for Summer Sausage Seasonings



  • @jonathon do you have or know where to buy motors for vertical stuffers?


  • Admin

    @revid The only thing we offer motorized on vertical sausage stuffers is the Walton’s 26 lb Electric Stuffer. This is a self-contained unit though, and is not an option to add to other vertical stuffers.

    I do plan on trying to add an external motor to our existing line of sausage stuffers in the next year, 2019 (no promises, but I hope to make things work), but currently, we do not have another option.



  • @austin sounds good keep us posted if you do come up with one. The small 3/8 tubes are brutal to stuff through.


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