Meat grinder sausage stuffer attachment verses an actual sausage stuffer



  • Hello everyone,
    What are the pros and cons of using the sausage stuffer attachment on a meat grinder verses an actual sausage stuffer?
    Seems like the preference is a sausage Stuffer that you hand crank.
    Why is that?
    If your using the stuffer attachment on a meat grinder,what is the disadvantage?
    I’m looking at purchaseing a separate manual stuffer because everyone recommends that it performs better than the attachment type on a meat grinder
    Any thoughts would be appreciated


  • Walton's Employee

    @stan I did a video where I went over how to use a grinder as a stuffer (you can view it here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPIsG8Fp6bw) and some of the disadvantages of it. There are three disadvantages I can think of off of the top of my head right now, it will be a lot slower doing it this way, you won’t be able to stuff really small diameter casings and I dont think it pushes the meat down consistently enough to fill the casings as well as a hand crank stuffer will do.

    Those are my thoughts, anyone got a differing opinion or another reason a stuffer is superior?



  • I purchased a stuffer off Amazon for under $100 and would never go back to using the grinder. With the grinder, it was always a two man job and took forever. The stuffer is much faster and have no problems doing it all by myself. Plus with a hand crank stuffer, no electricity usage and wear and tear on your grinder.


  • Regular Contributors

    @stan
    I’ve done a lot both ways. I would highly recommend a stuffer and I have the Weston grinder with the auger stuffing attachment. It’s slow, but if you’re doing 5# or 10# batches, it’s not that bad. I’ve had small 5# stuffer, old school cast iron Enterprise, 11# vertical and now a 35# hydraulic. Don’t get me wrong I wouldn’t trade the hydraulic but the 11# vertical I got on amazon had a lot of versatility. I think your bigger decision should be what type of stuffer should I buy. I would recommend the taller, smaller diameter instead of the large shorter one. The smaller diameter allow for a higher pressure for doing sticks with cure in them. The large short ones would be great for doing pork sausage or larger diameter casings, not 19-22mm sticks with cure. It would be fine as long as you’re doing fresh like breakfast or something like that. If you go the stuffer route I’d get it from Waltons and get the Weston-they stock parts, other no name from amazon is a one shot deal, once ours broke couldn’t find parts. Plus they have so many tube sizes now and Walton’s does a great job helping with casing and stuffing horn sizes, they carry them all.



  • @stan 'll echo the statements of others. Using your meat grinder to stuff can be labor intensive and slow going. An extra set of hands is almost required.



  • Another thing to consider is when you are making large amounts of Sausage it is easier to keep everything ice cold to end up with a Sausage that is a better end product.



  • @jonathon

    Thank you Jonathon!


  • Walton's Employee

    @namrats Is 100% correct and it’s an important note. The colder your product is when grinding and stuffing the easier everything will be and the better product you will end up with!



  • @stan the stuffer attachment works fine if you have a foot pedal and only use for the one or two pound bags or for stuffing bologna i fine trying to stuff sausage it is to fast and not as steady a flow and you get a lot more blow outs


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