Sure Cure Vs. Tenderquick



  • Is Sure Cure the same as Tenderquick? If I understand things correctly, both are used for quick (overnight?) curing as opposed to Cure #2 which is used for long term dry curing. Is this correct and can Tenderquick be used the same way you would use Tenderquick?
    I have both in the cupboard and was wondering which one would be best for the cooked pepperoni I will be making tomorrow.
    Thanks


  • Regular Contributors

    @Ed_Orum Tenderquick and Sure Cure are not the same and are not interchangeable. Sure Cure #2 is 5.67% sodium nitrite and 3.63% sodium nitrate whereas Tenderquick is about .5% Sodium Nitrite and .5% Sodium Nitrate. Tenderquick also contains other ingredients that are not in Sure Cure. If you are making cooked pepperoni stick with the cure that is specified by the recipe you are following so you will add the correct amount sodium nitrite/nitrate to result in a safe product. I am wondering if the recipe calls for Sure Cure #2 or #1. Most cooked/smoked pepperoni recipes I have specify #1. In case you were wondering Sure Cure #1 and #2 are also not interchangeable. I hope this helps.



  • Yes, I did a little more research. I used Tenderquick after looking up the right amounts to use on the Mortons web site. The Sure Cure I bought from Waltons is a 4oz package, and I was only making a “test” batch today of 4lbs, so it was darn near impossible for me to get the correct amount of Sure Cure.


  • Walton's Employee

    @ed_orum I went through all of our cures, seasonings, and additives and broke down everything by 1 and 5 lb batches. I measured out weight and volume so people could do it without a scale. You can see them in the seasoning section of the Walton’s learning center https://meatgistics.waltonsinc.com/category/23/seasonings.



  • @jonathon Thanks!


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